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Here is the situation:

class Base
{
 object* mainObject;
}

class Derived :
 public Base
{
 class aTrain
 {
   void* something;
   .
   .
   .
   ~aTrain()
   {
    mainObject->destroyingMethod(something);
   }
 };
}

Outputs: a nonstatic member reference must be relative to specific object.

I can understand the problem, yet how can I solve this without passing the Derived class to aTrain constructor?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't solve this without passing some sort of reference to mainobject in to aTrain. Whether you do this by passing a reference to a Derived object in to the aTrain constructor or by passing a reference to mainobject in to aTrain via a member function of aTrain or any other possible combination is up to you.

The thing is that there is no implicit way for an inner class to access non-static members of the class that it is contained in.

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Defining aTrain inside Derived affects the scope and access of the type aTrain.

It does not mean that every aTrain has an associated Derived. There can be any number of aTrain instances and separately any number of Derived instances.

So if you want every aTrain to know about some Derived instance, you will have to implement that, with a pointer or reference member.

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