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I'm familiar with the problem of modifying a collection while looping over it with a foreach loop (i.e. "System.InvalidOperationException: Collection was modified"). However, it doesn't make sense to me that when I use Linq to create a List of keys to delete from a dictionary, then loop over my new List, I get the same exception.

Code before, that threw an exception:

IEnumerable<Guid> keysToDelete = _outConnections.Where(
    pair => pair.Value < timeoutPoint
).Select(pair => pair.Key);

foreach (Guid key in keysToDelete)
{
    ...some stuff not dealing with keysToDelete...
    _outConnections.Remove(key);
}

Code after, that worked:

List<Guid> keysToDelete = _outConnections.Where(
    pair => pair.Value < timeoutPoint
).Select(pair => pair.Key).ToList();

for (int i=keysToDelete.Count-1; i>=0; i--)
{
    Guid key = keysToDelete[i];
    ...some stuff not dealing with keysToDelete...
    _outConnections.Remove(key);
}

Why is this? I have the feeling that maybe my Linq queries aren't really returning a new collection, but rather some subset of the original collection, hence it accuses me of modifying the collection keysToDelete when I remove an element from _outConnections.

Update: the following fix also works, thanks to Adam Robinson:

List<Guid> keysToDelete = _outConnections.Where(
    pair => pair.Value < timeoutPoint
).Select(pair => pair.Key).ToList();

foreach (Guid key in keysToDelete)
{
    ...some stuff not dealing with keysToDelete...
    _outConnections.Remove(key);
}
share|improve this question
1  
If I could tell people just one thing about LINQ queries it's that the result of a query expression is the query itself, not the results of the query. This common misunderstanding underlies a considerable fraction of the questions about LINQ on StackOverflow. –  Eric Lippert Oct 9 '09 at 17:14
    
When I discovered Linq, I thought "oh hey, this lets me do stuff like in Ruby!", and I still internally think of methods like Select and Where in terms of Ruby's map and select, which do the processing and return a new collection of results. I'll have to start mentally separating the Ruby methods from similar-seeming Linq methods. –  Sarah Vessels Oct 9 '09 at 17:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You're correct. LINQ uses what's called "deferred execution". Declaring your LINQ query doesn't actually do anything other than construct a query expression. It isn't until you actually enumerate over the list that the query is evaluated, and it uses the original list as the source.

However, calling ToList() should create a brand new list that has no relation to the original. Check the call stack of your exception to ensure that it is actually being thrown by keysToDelete.

share|improve this answer
    
Whoops, forgot that part of my fix involved adding the ToList. Originally, I just worked with the IEnumerable; updated question code to reflect this. –  Sarah Vessels Oct 9 '09 at 15:11
    
Oho, based on your second paragraph, I could alter my fix to one of the following: 1) remove the ToList stuff and just use my for loop over the IEnumerable or 2) keep the ToList stuff and switch back to using a foreach loop since the new List is a separate collection. Thanks! –  Sarah Vessels Oct 9 '09 at 15:12
1  
You can't use the for option, since IEnumerable doesn't support index-based access. I would recommend switching to a foreach over the result of the ToList(). –  Adam Robinson Oct 9 '09 at 15:43
    
Agreed. I don't like those simple for loops because they don't seem nearly as safe as a foreach. I added my new solution (ToList with foreach) to the question. –  Sarah Vessels Oct 9 '09 at 17:34

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