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In learncpp I noticed that it says that 2 bits can store 4 different values and they give an example in the table. I am somewhat confused by what they mean. My original interpretation was that 2 bits can only store 2 values (ie. just 0 and 1 since the definition of a binary digit is 0 or 1). However after looking at the table, do they mean that two bits can store 4 different COMBINATIONS of values (ie. 00 01 10 11).

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-5 is a bit harsh... –  Michael Petrotta Mar 16 '13 at 0:28
    
Research base X encoding (where X can be 2, 10, 16, whatever). That's like 8th grade maths. –  syam Mar 16 '13 at 0:31
    
Removed C++ tag as it is not relevant to the question. –  JBentley Mar 16 '13 at 0:38
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@MichaelPetrotta Fully agree. Uprated the original question to help counteract. This is a valid question many beginners would ask, and was worded fairly clearly. –  Jamin Grey Mar 16 '13 at 0:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

do they mean that two bits can store 4 different COMBINATIONS of values (ie. 00 01 10 11).

Yes. Each unique "combination" (actually they are permutations) of bits represents a different value.

This is no different to the system of counting you are used to: the decimal system, except instead of each digit having two possible states (0 and 1) they have ten possible states (0, 1, ..., 8, 9). In binary (base 2), two digits can represent four different values (2 ^ 2), and in decimal (base 10), two digits can represent 100 different values (10 ^ 2).

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They mean exactly that: Two bits store the values 0, 1, 2, and 3, which have a binary encoding of 00, 01, 10, and 11, respectively.

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those encodings could also be 0, 1, -2, and -1 respectively. –  Mooing Duck Mar 16 '13 at 0:28
    
No one said it was signed. –  greyfade Mar 16 '13 at 0:29
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@greyfade no one said it was unsigned either (or even that it was consecutive values -- it could well be 3, 42, -12 and 37). It's just 4 different values but we don't know them. –  syam Mar 16 '13 at 0:33

To work out the number of permutations you can do base^length and 2^2 is 4. There are 4 permutations possible in 2 bits.

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