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I am learning java and am practising arrays. I decided to generate a Fibonacci series as an experiment and can't help but think there might be a simpler way to generate the series (using an array and loop).

Any thoughts?

//Generate a Fibonacci series
public class Array {

   public static void main(String[] args) {
      // An array to store the values
      int[] intArray = new int[20];

      // starting values for the sequence
      intArray[0] = 0;
      intArray[1] = 1;

      //display the first values
      System.out.println("array["+(0)+"] = "+intArray[0]);
      System.out.println("array["+(1)+"] = "+intArray[1]);

      //generate the fibonnacci progression with a loop
      for (int count=2;count<intArray.length;count++){ 
      intArray[count] = intArray[(count-1)]+intArray[(count-2)];
      System.out.println("array["+(count)+"] = "+intArray[count]);  
   }
}
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6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would say the way you've done it is the most elegant and efficient way of solving this problem if you want to store all the values in an array. Storing the values is not necessary however.

On an aesthetic side note, the round brackets around your count variable and the numbers 0 and 1 are not necessary, and make the code quite messy to read.

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You should look for a recursive answer, there are many of them on this site. Eg. fibonacci series - recursive summation

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1  
I always though Fibonacci was an excellent example when to NOT use a recursive solution. Because the only numbers that are ultimately summed up are 1s in the tail of the recursion and therefore the time to run is proportional to the result. –  devconsole Mar 16 '13 at 0:36
    
There's absolutely nothing wrong with a dynamic programming solution. –  Makoto Mar 16 '13 at 0:38
    
There is nothing wrong with simple iterative solutions either, but the recursive solutions are elegant, not efficient, but the question was elegance. –  Peter Wooster Mar 16 '13 at 0:40

Here's an array-less solution -- Only 4 ints used.

public class Fibonacci
{
   public static void main(String[] args)
   {
      int first = 0;
      int second = 1;
      int sum;
      for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++)
      {
         sum = first + second;
         System.out.println("iteration " + i + ": " + sum);
         first = second;
         second = sum;
      }
   }
}

Output:

iteration 0: 1
iteration 1: 2
iteration 2: 3
iteration 3: 5
iteration 4: 8
iteration 5: 13
iteration 6: 21
iteration 7: 34
iteration 8: 55
iteration 9: 89
iteration 10: 144
iteration 11: 233
iteration 12: 377
iteration 13: 610
iteration 14: 987
iteration 15: 1597
iteration 16: 2584
iteration 17: 4181
iteration 18: 6765
iteration 19: 10946
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That's the shortest I could've done:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int a = 0, b = 1;
    long length = 20;
    System.out.println(a);
    System.out.println(b);
    while (--length >= 0)
        System.out.println((a = (b = a + b) - a) * 0 + b);
}

Gives:

0 1 1 2 3 5 8 13...

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Ever tested a solution like this one? It uses the Moivre-Binet Formula. With long type I get precision errors for n > 71.

public static void main(String[] args) {
   for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
      System.out.println(getFibonacci(i));
   }
}

private static int getFibonacci(int n) {
   return (int) ((1D / Math.sqrt(5D)) * ((Math.pow(((1D + Math.sqrt(5D)) / 2D), n)) - Math.pow(((1D - Math.sqrt(5D)) / 2D), n)));
}

The higher the n the slower or memory hungrier the naive or recursive algorithms are. The following recursive example works for me up to n=14832. May be pending on my current JVM settings.

static final Map<Integer,BigInteger> FIBONACCI_RESULTS = new HashMap<>();


private static BigInteger getFibonacciRecursive(final int n) {
   return ((n == 1) || (n == 2)) ? BigInteger.ONE : fetchResult(n);
}

private static BigInteger fetchResult(final int n) {
   BigInteger result;
   System.out.println("n := "+n);
   if (FIBONACCI_RESULTS.containsKey(n)) {
      result = FIBONACCI_RESULTS.get(n);
   } else {
      result = getFibonacciRecursive(n - 1).add(getFibonacciRecursive(n - 2));
      FIBONACCI_RESULTS.put(n, result);
   }
   return result;
}
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The most elegant and well structured program to generate the Fibonacci series that I could make is this:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class fibon{

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("How many times shall we generate the fibonacci series?");
        int max = scan.nextInt();
        scan.close();
        fibgen(max);
    }
    public static void fibgen(int max) {
        int f = 0, s = 1;
        for(int i = 0; i <= max; i++) {
            f += s;
            s = f - s;
            System.out.println(s + " ");
        }

    }
}
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