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Does anyone have a solution to the task of processing a multi-line string one line at a time, other than the string-as-a-filehandle solution shown below?

my $multiline_string = "line one\nline two\nline three\nline four";
my $filehandle;
open( $filehandle, '<', \$multiline_string )
    or croak("Can't open multi-line string as a filehandle: $!");
while ( defined (my $single_line = <$filehandle>) ) {
    # do some processing of $single_line here ...
}
close( $filehandle );

My reason for not wanting to use a filehandle is pretty weak. Test::Perl::Critic whines when I have more than 10 source lines between my open command and my close command on any filehandle. I'm doing quite a bit of processing of $single_line so I actually have about 40 lines of code between my open call and my close call and I don't see any way to bring that down to 10.

And I don't really want to ignore the Perl::Critic test in my build because that's actually a decent test that I'd like to pass whenever I'm opening an actual disk file in my code.

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2  
If $multiline_string is large, the list returned by split will be even larger and defeat the line-by-line processing of $multiline_string. Either use a regular expression to match lines one at a time, or factor out the work you do to a subroutine. I personally would prefer the latter. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 9 '09 at 15:59
    
wow. how silly of me not to think of the subroutine workaround. sometimes I just don't think things through. :-) –  Kurt W. Leucht Oct 9 '09 at 16:16

8 Answers 8

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Make the Perl Critic happy, and make yourself even happier, by creating a subroutine, and calling it with each line of the file.

use strict; use warnings;

sub do_something {
    my ($line) = @_;
    # do something with $line
}

open my $fh, '<', \$multiline_string
    or die "Cannot open scalar for reading: $!";

while(<$fh>) {
    chomp;
    do_something($_);
}

close $fh;
share|improve this answer
    
This is definitely the right way to do it. However, you should always check if open succeeded and use the 3-arg form of open with lexical filehandles. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 9 '09 at 16:00
1  
Or at least always use 3-arg open. You can "use autodie" (along with strict and warnings) and if you don't want to bother with checking whether your opens succeed. –  Dave Sherohman Oct 9 '09 at 19:21
1  
I thank my editors. I haven't used Perl for 4 years, so... –  Jonathan Feinberg Oct 9 '09 at 19:38

Um, isn't the purpose of the whine to get you to have smaller blocks of code that do just one thing? make a subroutine that does what's needed for each line.

Many people have suggested split /\n/. split /^/ is more like the filehandle way.

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What about:

my $multiline_string = "line one\nline two\nline three\nline four";
my @lines = split(/\n/,$multiline_string);
foreach my $line (@lines) {
    #do stuff with string
}
share|improve this answer

I might be missing something, but could you do:

my @lines = split(/\n/,$multiline_string);
foreach my $single_line (@lines) {
  ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Don't forget you can process a multiline string with regexps using the /m or /s option, as described in perldoc perlre -- this may be easier than splitting on \n, depending on what you're searching for. –  Ether Oct 9 '09 at 19:49

Long before I even knew you could shoehorn a multiline string into a filehandle, there was split:

foreach my $single_line (split /\n/, $multiline_string) {
    # process $single_line here
    # although note that it doesn't end in a newline anymore
}

Insert disclaimer about using literal and non-portable \n here.

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Perl::Critic is nice, but when you start obsessing about some of its arbitary requirements, it starts to waste your time rather than save it. I just let the filehandle go out of scope and don't worry about the close:

 my $multiline_string = "line one\nline two\nline three\nline four";

 {
     open my( $fh ), '<', \$multiline_string )
         or croak("Can't open multi-line string as a filehandle: $!");
     while ( defined (my $single_line = <$fh>) ) {
         # do some processing of $single_line here ...
     }
 }

A lot of people reach for regexes or split, but I think that's sloppy. You don't need to create a new list and use up a lot more memory in your program.

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You could use a regex.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $s = "line one\nline two\nline three\nline four";

while ($s =~ m'^(.*)$'gm) {
    print "'$1'\n";
}

die "Exited loop too early\n" unless pos $s == length $s;

Or you could use split:

for my $line ( split m'\n', $multiline_string ){

  # ...

}
share|improve this answer
    
The regular expression approach is best IMHO. You do not need \G and /m. Use: while ( $s =~ /(.+?)\n/g ) {. split is wasteful because it would mean keeping two copies of essentially the same data in memory. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 9 '09 at 15:53
1  
*, not + there, or you'd skip empty lines. And ? is useless. \n belongs in the capture to be more like the filehandle read way. –  ysth Oct 9 '09 at 16:01
    
And while \G may be unneeded, I'd keep it; when you expect to consume all string piecemeal, it's best to enforce it (with m/\G.../gc and a pos() check after the loop) so you don't accidentally miswrite your regex and lose some of the data (like your + instead of *). –  ysth Oct 9 '09 at 16:03
    
@ysth Note that the OP's string does not end with a \n. To process that string correctly + would be needed and \n would have to be optional. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 9 '09 at 16:11
    
@Sinan Ünür: then you'd need /\G(?:.*\n|.+)/gc (or some variant; many ways to do it). But I wouldn't be surprised if the real data had a newline at the end. –  ysth Oct 9 '09 at 18:13

Personally I like using $/ to separate the lines in a multiline string.

my $multiline_string = "line one\nline two\nline three\nline four";
foreach (split($/, $mutliline_string)) {
  process_file($_);
}
sub process_file {
  my $filename = shift;
  my $filehandle;
  open( $filehandle, '<', $filename )
      or croak("Can't open multi-line string as a filehandle: $!");
  while ( defined (my $single_line = <$filehandle>) ) {
      process_line($single_line);
  }
  close( $filehandle );
}
sub process_line {
  my $line = shift;
  ...
}
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