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I tried to copy an InputStream to a File, and abort the copy if the size of InputStream is greater than 1MB. In Java7, I wrote code as below:

public void copy(InputStream input, Path target) {
    OutputStream out = Files.newOutputStream(target,
            StandardOpenOption.CREATE_NEW, StandardOpenOption.WRITE);
    boolean isExceed = false;
    try {
        long nread = 0L;
        byte[] buf = new byte[BUFFER_SIZE];
        int n;
        while ((n = input.read(buf)) > 0) {
            out.write(buf, 0, n);
            nread += n;
            if (nread > 1024 * 1024) {// Exceed 1 MB
                isExceed = true;
                break;
            }
        }
    } catch (IOException ex) {
        throw ex;
    } finally {
        out.close();
        if (isExceed) {// Abort the copy
            Files.deleteIfExists(target);
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
        }
    }}
  • First question: is there any better solution for it?
  • Second question: my other solution - Before the copy operation, I calculate the size of this InputStream. So I copy the InputStream to ByteArrayOutputStream then get size(). But the problem is InputStream may not markSupported(), so the InputStream cannot be reused in a copy file operation.
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

First question: is there any better solution for it?

Not really. Certainly, not significantly better.

Second question: my other solution - Before the copy operation, I calculate size of InputStream. So I copy the InputStream to ByteArrayOutputStream then get size(). But the problem is InputStream may not markSupported(), so the InputStream cannot be reused in copy file operation.

Leaving aside that the above is a statement not a question ...

If you have copied the bytes to the ByteArrayOutputStream, you can then create a ByteArrayInputStream from the byte array returned by baos.toByteArray(). So you don't need to mark / reset the original stream.

However, that is a pretty ugly way of implementing this. Not least because you are reading and buffering the entire input stream anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Do you mean you agree with my copy() solution? – 卢声远 Shengyuan Lu Mar 16 '13 at 4:36
1  
Correct. If MOST of the calls to the method resulted in aborts, then you might consider reading up to 1Mb into a buffer, and only creating the output file if the input isn't too big. But I doubt that that is going to be true. – Stephen C Mar 16 '13 at 4:36

There are following ready solutions for this:

share|improve this answer

I like the ByteArrayOutputStream-based solution, I cant see why it cant work

public void copy(InputStream input, Path target) throws IOException {
    ByteArrayOutputStream bos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
    BufferedInputStream bis = new BufferedInputStream(input);
    for (int b = 0; (b = bis.read()) != -1;) {
        if (bos.size() > BUFFER_SIZE) {
            throw new IOException();
        }
        bos.write(b);
    }
    Files.write(target, bos.toByteArray());
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sure, it can work. I'd just question the utility of buffering the file in memory like that. Unless we assume that there are going to be a significant percentage of the "too big" case, it is cheaper and simpler to just write straight to the output file ... and delete it in the error case as the OP is doing. – Stephen C Mar 16 '13 at 6:23
    
Vote up. My concern is that the limit will be much higher in the future, as result ByteArrayOutputStream will consume hugh memory. – 卢声远 Shengyuan Lu Mar 16 '13 at 6:28

You could have a look at this library.

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My personal choice is an InputStream wrapper that counts bytes as it reads them:

public class LimitedSizeInputStream extends InputStream {

    private final InputStream original;
    private final long maxSize;
    private long total;

    public LimitedSizeInputStream(InputStream original, long maxSize) {
        this.original = original;
        this.maxSize = maxSize;
    }

    @Override
    public int read() throws IOException {
        int i = original.read();
        if (i>=0) incrementCounter(1);
        return i;
    }

    @Override
    public int read(byte b[]) throws IOException {
        return read(b, 0, b.length);
    }

    @Override
    public int read(byte b[], int off, int len) throws IOException {
        int i = original.read(b, off, len);
        if (i>=0) incrementCounter(i);
        return i;
    }

    private void incrementCounter(int size) throws IOException {
        total += size;
        if (total>maxSize) throw new IOException("InputStream exceeded maximum size in bytes.");
    }

}

I like this approach because it is transparent, it is re-usable with all input streams and it works well with other libraries. For example copying files up to 4KB with Apache Commons:

InputStream in = new LimitedSizeInputStream(new FileInputStream("from.txt"), 4096);
OutputStream out = new FileOutputStream("to.txt");
IOUtils.copy(in, out);

PS: The main difference of the implementation above with BoundedInputStream is that BoundedInputStream does not throw an exception when the limit is exceeded (it just closes the stream)

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