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This goes to the fact that you cannot extend a class with no no-arg constructor in Java. The canonical use for ReflectionToStringBuilder is as follows

public String toString() {
     return (new ReflectionToStringBuilder(this) {
         protected boolean accept(Field f) {
             return super.accept(f) && !f.getName().equals("password");
         }
     }).toString();
 }

Is it possible to somehow not repeat this if it has to be done multiple time. I really think so but maybe someone more advanced than me might have a suggestion. What really want to do is actually add a method.

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4  
You certainly can extend a class with no parameterless constructor. You just need to call one of the other constructors from each of your class's constructors. –  Jon Skeet Oct 9 '09 at 16:11
    
I agree with Jon. Have to do a -1 "completely bad assumption" since the question itself is kind of misleading and not useful. –  Bill K Oct 9 '09 at 16:46
    
Yes indeed, was my long held erroneous assumption -- I actually held it as fact until I came across this case but now I know –  non sequitor Oct 9 '09 at 16:51
    
If you rephrase the question to not be misleading, I'll remove the -1, but as is it should be voted down a few more so it's obvious that it's misleading. The questions on this site stick around and are considered reference. –  Bill K Oct 9 '09 at 22:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
class NonPasswordShowingStringBuilder extends ReflectionToStringBuilder
{
    protected boolean accept(Field f) {
         return super.accept(f) && !f.getName().equals("password");
    }

    public NonPasswordShowingStringBuilder(Object o) { super(o); }
}

unless I'm missing something.

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lol u didn't miss a thing but I did -- IBM compiler gave out the wrong message, cheers Jon. –  non sequitor Oct 9 '09 at 16:05

Another approach, useful if there are other parameters to be passed to your code is to put the anonymous inner class in a method:

public static ReflectionToStringBuilder toStringBuilder(Object obj) {
    return new ReflectionToStringBuilder(obj) {
        @Override protected boolean accept(Field f) {
            return super.accept(f) && !f.getName().equals("password");
        }
    };
}
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