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I've been struggling with this for a while now. Here is my situation - one of the properties of the class that I'm trying to serialize contains an IEnumerable (which can't be serialized since it's an interface), I can't go and change the property (I can't add attributes to it either). Here is the code I've got so far:

// Ignore the byte array containing the Data for the serialization
xmlAttrOverrides.Add(typeof (FileContent), "Data", xmlIgnoreAttr);

using (var writer = xmlDocument.CreateWriter())
{
    var serializableTypes = GetSerializableSubTypes();
    var serializer = new XmlSerializer(documentPackage.GetType(), xmlAttrOverrides, serializableTypes, null, null);

    serializer.Serialize(writer, documentPackage);
}

Is there a way to setup the XmlSerializer so that every time it sees an IList or an IEnumerable to "convert" them to a List (or Array). Any help would be highly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
IEnumerable can't be deserialized... it may be useful to clarify if you are ok with just saving object. –  Alexei Levenkov Mar 16 '13 at 7:39
    
Actually I'm ok with even ignoring it all together if that would work ? –  Dimitar Dimitrov Mar 16 '13 at 7:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since you can't change the class, create a new class, inheriting from the class you want to serialize and from IXmlSerializable. In addition, you can override the base Colors array with the new keyword.

Try this one:

public class Something
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public string Text { get; set; }

    public IEnumerable<string> Colors { get; set; }
}

public class MySerializableSomething : Something, IXmlSerializable
{
    public new List<string> Colors { get; set; }

    public MySerializableSomething()
    {
        Colors = new List<string>();
    }

    public XmlSchema GetSchema()
    {
        return null;
    }

    public void ReadXml(XmlReader reader)
    {
        while (reader.Read())
        {
            switch (reader.LocalName)
            {
                case "Id": Id = reader.ReadElementContentAsInt(); break;
                case "Text": Text = reader.ReadElementContentAsString(); break;
                case "Color": Colors.Add(reader.ReadElementContentAsString()); break;
            }
        }
    }

    public void WriteXml(XmlWriter writer)
    {
        writer.WriteElementString("Id", Id.ToString());
        writer.WriteElementString("Text", Text);

        writer.WriteStartElement("Colors");

        foreach (var color in Colors)
        {
            writer.WriteElementString("Color", color);
        }

        writer.WriteEndElement();
    }
}

Here you can see I have an IEnumerable<string>. Normally wouldn't work.. so I wrap it and then serialize the wrapped one. If you need to, you can then convert it to the normal base class.. not the greatest solution, but since you said you can't change the base class, then there's not a lot of options here...

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, good stuff, mate. I guess I'll go this direction. Thanks. –  Dimitar Dimitrov Mar 16 '13 at 8:59

Write your own custom XmlSerializer class by implementing IXmlSerializable, refer msdn for its usage

share|improve this answer
    
IXmlSerializable has to be implemented by the classes that I'm trying to serialize (which is not what I want to do, I can't touch those classes, all I have to work with is the XmlSerializer). –  Dimitar Dimitrov Mar 16 '13 at 7:42
2  
@DimitarDimitrov IXmlSerializable need not be implemented by the class you wish to serialize, you can create a seperate class which could take any type and generates xml out of it –  Krishnaswamy Subramanian Mar 16 '13 at 7:50

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