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Does anyone know of an open-source library that allows you to parse and read .csv files in C#?

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1  
I found one! filehelpers.com :) –  diegocaro Oct 9 '09 at 16:12

7 Answers 7

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Take a look at A Fast CSV Reader on CodeProject.

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Yeah, that one is great, aka LumenWorks.Framework.IO.Csv by Sebastien Lorien –  codeulike Oct 9 '09 at 16:18

Here, written by yours truly to use generic collections and iterator blocks. It supports double-quote enclosed text fields (including ones that span mulitple lines) using the double-escaped convention (so "" inside a quoted field reads as single quote character). It does not support:

  • Single-quote enclosed text
  • \ -escaped quoted text
  • alternate delimiters (won't yet work on pipe or tab delimited fields)
  • Unquoted text fields that begin with a quote

But all of those would be easy enough to add if you need them. I haven't benchmarked it anywhere (I'd love to see some results), but performance should be very good - better than anything that's .Split() based anyway.

Now on GitHub

Update: felt like adding single-quote enclosed text support. It's a simple change, but I typed it right into the reply window so it's untested. Use the revision link at the bottom if you'd prefer the old (tested) code.

public static class CSV
{
    public static IEnumerable<IList<string>> FromFile(string fileName)
    {
        foreach (IList<string> item in FromFile(fileName, ignoreFirstLineDefault)) yield return item;
    }

    public static IEnumerable<IList<string>> FromFile(string fileName, bool ignoreFirstLine)
    {
        using (StreamReader rdr = new StreamReader(fileName))
        {
            foreach(IList<string> item in FromReader(rdr, ignoreFirstLine)) yield return item;
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<IList<string>> FromStream(Stream csv)
    {
        foreach (IList<string> item in FromStream(csv, ignoreFirstLineDefault)) yield return item;
    }

    public static IEnumerable<IList<string>> FromStream(Stream csv, bool ignoreFirstLine)
    {
        using (var rdr = new StreamReader(csv))
        {
            foreach (IList<string> item in FromReader(rdr, ignoreFirstLine)) yield return item;
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<IList<string>> FromReader(TextReader csv)
    {
        //Probably should have used TextReader instead of StreamReader
        foreach (IList<string> item in FromReader(csv, ignoreFirstLineDefault)) yield return item;
    }

    public static IEnumerable<IList<string>> FromReader(TextReader csv, bool ignoreFirstLine)
    {
        if (ignoreFirstLine) csv.ReadLine();

        IList<string> result = new List<string>();

        StringBuilder curValue = new StringBuilder();
        char c;
        c = (char)csv.Read();
        while (csv.Peek() != -1)
        {
            switch (c)
            {
                case ',': //empty field
                    result.Add("");
                    c = (char)csv.Read();
                    break;
                case '"': //qualified text
                case '\'':
                    char q = c;
                    c = (char)csv.Read();
                    bool inQuotes = true;
                    while (inQuotes && csv.Peek() != -1)
                    {
                        if (c == q)
                        {
                            c = (char)csv.Read();
                            if (c != q)
                                inQuotes = false;
                        }

                        if (inQuotes)
                        {
                            curValue.Append(c);
                            c = (char)csv.Read();
                        } 
                    }
                    result.Add(curValue.ToString());
                    curValue = new StringBuilder();
                    if (c == ',') c = (char)csv.Read(); // either ',', newline, or endofstream
                    break;
                case '\n': //end of the record
                case '\r':
                    //potential bug here depending on what your line breaks look like
                    if (result.Count > 0) // don't return empty records
                    {
                        yield return result;
                        result = new List<string>();
                    }
                    c = (char)csv.Read();
                    break;
                default: //normal unqualified text
                    while (c != ',' && c != '\r' && c != '\n' && csv.Peek() != -1)
                    {
                        curValue.Append(c);
                        c = (char)csv.Read();
                    }
                    result.Add(curValue.ToString());
                    curValue = new StringBuilder();
                    if (c == ',') c = (char)csv.Read(); //either ',', newline, or endofstream
                    break;
            }

        }
        if (curValue.Length > 0) //potential bug: I don't want to skip on a empty column in the last record if a caller really expects it to be there
            result.Add(curValue.ToString());
        if (result.Count > 0) 
            yield return result;

    }
    private static bool ignoreFirstLineDefault = false;
}
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1  
Can it handle commas inside quoted string? "like,this" ... and can it handle carriage returns in quoted strings? ... those are some of the things that tend to cause trouble... –  codeulike Oct 9 '09 at 16:48
    
Yes, it can handle both. That's the whole point of quoted strings. –  Joel Coehoorn Oct 9 '09 at 16:56
1  
I still like this, but if I had it to do over I'd probably inherit TextReader –  Joel Coehoorn Oct 9 '09 at 19:05
    
I'm doing a bit of game development and probably using .CSV files in early stages. I'm interested in what you have here as well as inheriting TextReader. –  IAbstract Jan 21 '11 at 17:51
    
Works very nicely –  Mark Withers Mar 22 '11 at 12:58

The last time this question was asked, here's the answer I gave:

If you're just trying to read a CSV file with C#, the easiest thing is to use the Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser class. It's actually built into the .NET Framework, instead of being a third-party extension.

Yes, it is in Microsoft.VisualBasic.dll, but that doesn't mean you can't use it from C# (or any other CLR language).

Here's an example of usage, taken from the MSDN documentation:

Using MyReader As New _
Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser("C:\testfile.txt")
   MyReader.TextFieldType = FileIO.FieldType.Delimited
   MyReader.SetDelimiters(",")
   Dim currentRow As String()
   While Not MyReader.EndOfData
      Try
         currentRow = MyReader.ReadFields()
         Dim currentField As String
         For Each currentField In currentRow
            MsgBox(currentField)
         Next
      Catch ex As Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.MalformedLineException
      MsgBox("Line " & ex.Message & _
      "is not valid and will be skipped.")
      End Try
   End While
End Using

Again, this example is in VB.NET, but it would be trivial to translate it to C#.

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1  
+1 I didn't know about this class but it works really well. –  Remko Jansen Aug 5 '11 at 15:11

I really like the FileHelpers library. It's fast, it's C# 100%, it's available for FREE, it's very flexible and easy to use.

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1  
The FileHelpers Wizard looks really useful at creating standard classes quickly. –  John M Jun 2 '10 at 12:14

Besides parsing/reading, some libraries do other nice things like convert the parsed data into object for you.

Here is an example of using CsvHelper to read a CSV file into objects.

var csv = new CsvHelper( File.OpenRead( "file.csv" ) );
var myCustomObjectList = csv.Reader.GetRecords<MyCustomObject>();

By default, conventions are used for matching the headers/columns with the properties. You can change the behavior by changing the settings.

// Using attributes:
public class MyCustomObject
{
    [CsvField( Name = "First Name" )]
    public string StringProperty { get; set; }

    [CsvField( Index = 0 )]
    public int IntProperty { get; set; }

    [CsvField( Ignore = true )]
    public string ShouldIgnore { get; set; }
}

Sometimes you don't "own" the object you want to populate the data with. In this case you can use fluent class mapping.

// Fluent class mapping:
public sealed class MyCustomObjectMap : CsvClassMap<MyCustomObject>
{
    public MyCustomObjectMap()
    {
        Map( m => m.StringProperty ).Name( "First Name" );
        Map( m => m.IntProperty ).Index( 0 );
        Map( m => m.ShouldIgnore ).Ignore();
    }
}
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What I don't understand from the documentation is, when do I use mapping and when should I not use mapping? Let's say, I just want to parse an xml file and extra keywords and their attached data. Do I need to use a map for that? –  Kala J May 19 at 15:26
    
If you are parsing XML, you shouldn't use a CSV library to do it. Attribute mapping no longer exists since 2.0. The reason you'd use a mapping file is if you want to change any of the default ways the library read the file. A mapping will give you a lot of control over how the file is read/written. –  Josh Close May 19 at 15:32
    
Opps, that was slip of tongue... I meant *CSV of course. Mapping doesn't exist in .NET 4.0/5? Also, on that note, what would you recommend I use instead for parsing CSV and grabbing only certain keywords and their data? –  Kala J May 19 at 16:15
    
There will be too much discussion for this site. Can you ask the question on github or the google group? github.com/JoshClose/CsvHelper/issues or groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/csvhelper –  Josh Close May 19 at 16:22

I'm implementing Daniel Pryden's answer in C#, so it is easier to cut and paste and customize. I think this is the easiest method for parsing CSV files. Just add a reference and you are basically done.

Add the Microsoft.VisualBasic Reference to your project

Then here is sample code in C# from Joel's answer:

        using (Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser MyReader = new           
                  Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser(filename))
        {
            MyReader.TextFieldType = Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.FieldType.Delimited;
            MyReader.SetDelimiters(",");

            while (!MyReader.EndOfData)
            {
                try
                {
                    string[] fields = MyReader.ReadFields();
                    if (first) {
                        first = false;
                        continue;
                    }

                    // This is how I treat my data, you'll need to throw this out.

                    //"Type"    "Post Date" "Description"   "Amount"
                    LineItem li = new LineItem();

                    li.date        = DateTime.Parse(fields[1]);
                    li.description = fields[2];
                    li.Value       = Convert.ToDecimal(fields[3]);

                    lineitems1.Add(li);
                }
                catch (Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.MalformedLineException ex)
                {
                    MessageBox.Show("Line " + ex.Message + "is not valid and will be skipped.");
                }
            }
        }
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You can use Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser

get below code example from above article

static void Main()
        {
            string csv_file_path=@"C:\Users\Administrator\Desktop\test.csv";

            DataTable csvData = GetDataTabletFromCSVFile(csv_file_path);

            Console.WriteLine("Rows count:" + csvData.Rows.Count);

            Console.ReadLine();
        }


private static DataTable GetDataTabletFromCSVFile(string csv_file_path)
        {
            DataTable csvData = new DataTable();

            try
            {

            using(TextFieldParser csvReader = new TextFieldParser(csv_file_path))
                {
                    csvReader.SetDelimiters(new string[] { "," });
                    csvReader.HasFieldsEnclosedInQuotes = true;
                    string[] colFields = csvReader.ReadFields();
                    foreach (string column in colFields)
                    {
                        DataColumn datecolumn = new DataColumn(column);
                        datecolumn.AllowDBNull = true;
                        csvData.Columns.Add(datecolumn);
                    }

                    while (!csvReader.EndOfData)
                    {
                        string[] fieldData = csvReader.ReadFields();
                        //Making empty value as null
                        for (int i = 0; i < fieldData.Length; i++)
                        {
                            if (fieldData[i] == "")
                            {
                                fieldData[i] = null;
                            }
                        }
                        csvData.Rows.Add(fieldData);
                    }
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
            }
            return csvData;
        }
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