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Here is the script

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use  warnings;
my($dayago, $prefix, $today_timestamp, $f,
   $sec, $min, $hour, $mday, $mon, $year, $wday, $yday, $isdst,
   $daysago, $now, $old, @oldbackup);

opendir(DIR, "/home/ftpusr/backup/") || die("Error cannot open directory");

$now    = time();
$dayago = 3;

#($sec,$min,$hour,$mday,$mon,$year,$wday,$yday,$isdst) = localtime($now-$dayago*60*60*24);
#$today_timestamp=sprintf("%4d%02d%02d",$year+1900,$mon+1,$mday);
#$old_timestamp=

$prefix = ".CATN0000.";

do {
    ($sec, $min, $hour, $mday, $mon, $year, $wday, $yday, $isdst)
      = localtime($now - $dayago * 60 * 60 * 24);
    $today_timestamp = sprintf("%4d%02d%02d", $year + 1900, $mon + 1, $mday);
    while ($f = readdir(DIR)){
        if ( $f =~ /$prefix$today_timestamp/ ) {
            print "$f\n";
        }
    }
    $dayago -= 1;
    print "$dayago\n";
    print "$today_timestamp\n";
} until ($dayago == 0);
closedir(DIR);

Here are the files in the directory

-rw-r----- 1 db2inst1 db2grp1  184569856 2013-03-13 10:24 GSRTC.0.db2inst1.NODE0000.CATN0000.20130313102253.001
-rwxr-xr-x 1 db2inst1 db2grp1        259 2013-03-13 13:00 space_check.sh
-rw-r----- 1 db2inst1 db2grp1 1071665152 2013-03-14 10:06 AWDRT.0.db2inst1.NODE0000.CATN0000.20130314095856.001
-rw-r----- 1 db2inst1 db2grp1  184569856 2013-03-14 10:20 GSRTC.0.db2inst1.NODE0000.CATN0000.20130314101854.001
-rw-r--r-- 1 db2inst1 db2grp1          0 2013-03-14 13:49 bkp.sh
-rwxrwxrwx 1 db2inst1 db2grp1       1070 2013-03-14 20:12 awdrt_tabspc_report.sh
-rw-r----- 1 db2inst1 db2grp1 1085296640 2013-03-15 10:11 AWDRT.0.db2inst1.NODE0000.CATN0000.20130315100434.001
-rw-r----- 1 db2inst1 db2grp1  184569856 2013-03-15 10:30 GSRTC.0.db2inst1.NODE0000.CATN0000.20130315102900.001
-rw-r----- 1 db2inst1 db2grp1 1075859456 2013-03-16 12:16 AWDRT.0.db2inst1.NODE0000.CATN0000.20130316121043.001

When I run the script the output is:

GSRTC.0.db2inst1.NODE0000.CATN0000.20130313102253.001
2
20130313
1
20130314
0
20130315

Instead I want these files:

-rw-r----- 1 db2inst1 db2grp1 1071665152 2013-03-14 10:06 AWDRT.0.db2inst1.NODE0000.CATN0000.20130314095856.001
-rw-r----- 1 db2inst1 db2grp1  184569856 2013-03-14 10:20 GSRTC.0.db2inst1.NODE0000.CATN0000.20130314101854.001
-rw-r----- 1 db2inst1 db2grp1 1085296640 2013-03-15 10:11 AWDRT.0.db2inst1.NODE0000.CATN0000.20130315100434.001
-rw-r----- 1 db2inst1 db2grp1  184569856 2013-03-15 10:30 GSRTC.0.db2inst1.NODE0000.CATN0000.20130315102900.001

All I want is it should leave the last file and remove the old backup . Help is appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Title should reflect the content of the question. –  jordanhill123 Mar 16 '13 at 10:35
    
Im sorry ......... Done –  mViswa Mar 16 '13 at 10:42
    
Please revise to indicate more clearly what you want to do. The last sentance is a start but I still can't make heads or tails of it. –  Joel Berger Mar 16 '13 at 14:04

3 Answers 3

  1. If you don't understand your code, reformat and refactor it until it is as clear as possible. E.g. you could put the timestamp generation code in a seperate subroutine, as the details only detract from the intention of your loop.
  2. Don't predeclare your variables. This is unperlish, makes bug hunts difficult, and are global variables in disguise. Rather, declare (and immediately initialize) your variables in the innermost scope where they are used.
  3. Don't use barewords as file- or directory handles.

Now on the actual problems:

  1. The readdir function used in list context will return all items in that directory. Used in scalar context, it returns the next entry, or undef if no further items are available. This makes it an iterator. To reset the iterator, you have to re-open the directory. It might be better to read all items into an array, and then select those items that match a particular pattern.
  2. In regexes, the period . is a metacharacter, that matches any non-newline character by default. To match a literal dot, you have to escape it, or enclose it in \Q...\E quotes.

Here is some code that might help you:

A sub that calculates a timestamp given $days_ago:

{ # begin a enclosing scope for private variable
    my $now = time;
    my $secs_per_day = 24 * 60 * 60;

    sub timestamp {
      my ($ago) = @_;
      # we can use `undef` for vars we don't use
      my (undef, undef, undef, $mday, $mon, $year)
          = localtime( $now - $ago * $secs_per_year);
      return sprintf '%04d%02d%02d', $year + 1900, $mon + 1, $mday;
    }
}

Reading in all files in a directory:

my $directory = '/foo/bar';
my @files = do {
  opendir my $dir, $directory or die "Can't open $directory: $!";
  readdir $dir;
};

This uses a do block. Lexical file- or dirhandles are closed automatically once they go out of scope. The variable $! contains the reason for failure.

Selecting all matching files:

sub matching_files {
    my ($days_ago, $files) = @_;
    my $timestamp = timestamp($days_ago)
    return grep /\Q .CATN0000. $timestamp \E/x, @$files;
}

This takes the days ago, and a reference to our file array. The /x modifier on the regex allows us to include non-matching whitespace for better formatting. The sub can be called like my @interesting = matching_files(7, \@files) (see the reference operator \).

Getting and printing all files up to two days ago

for my $days_ago (reverse 0 .. 2) {
   my @interesting = matching_files($days_ago, \@files);
   print "Days ago: $days_ago\n";
   print "$_\n" foreach @interesting;
}

The range operator .. creates the sequence 0, 1, 2, which we reverse. Looping constructs like for can appear as a trailing statement modifier. The inner foreach will put each item into $_.

share|improve this answer

I can't quite figure out what it is you are trying to do, but it has something to do with sorting (and possibly removing? though you don't remove anything) files by the date embedded in the name. Let me first point out the module Time::Piece which lets you have information as from localtime except stored in a handy object. Further you can create them from a formatted time using the strptime class method.

In the script below I create an array of array references, one for each file that matches the pattern. The first element of the arrayref is the file's name, the second is an Time::Piece object created from the first 8 digits of the date string in the name. I also create an object representing now.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Time::Piece;

my $now = localtime();

my $prefix = "CATN0000";
opendir(my $dir, "/home/ftpusr/backup/") || die("Error cannot open directory: $!");

my @files;
while ( my $file = readdir $dir ) {
  $file =~ /\.$prefix\.(\d{8})\d*\.\d{3}/ or next;
  push @files, [ $file, Time::Piece->strptime( $1, '%Y%m%d') ];
}

From this starting point you can sort by comparing the Time::Piece objects, compare them with the $now object, and do anything you want with the files as a result.

share|improve this answer

Yo this one worked for me ..........

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;


my($dayago,$prefix,$today_timestamp,$f,$sec,$min,$hour,$mday,$mon,$year,$wday,$yday,$isdst,$daysago,$now,$old,@oldbackup);
#opendir(DIR, "/home/ftpusr/backup/") || die("Error cannot open directory");
$now=time();
$dayago=3;
#($sec,$min,$hour,$mday,$mon,$year,$wday,$yday,$isdst) = localtime($now-$dayago*60*60*24);
#$today_timestamp=sprintf("%4d%02d%02d",$year+1900,$mon+1,$mday);
#$old_timestamp=
$prefix = ".CATN0000.";
do {
($sec,$min,$hour,$mday,$mon,$year,$wday,$yday,$isdst) = localtime($now-$dayago*60*60*24);
opendir(DIR, "/home/ftpusr/backup/") || die("Error cannot open directory");
$today_timestamp=sprintf("%4d%02d%02d",$year+1900,$mon+1,$mday);
while ($f = readdir(DIR)){
  if ( $f =~ /$prefix$today_timestamp/ ) {
        print "$f\n";
        }
}
$dayago -= 1;
print "$dayago\n";
print "$today_timestamp\n";
}until ($dayago == 0);
closedir(DIR);

Any better solutions ?????????

share|improve this answer

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