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Could someone help me with a loop please. I'm meant to be writing a program which simply asks you to guess a number between 1 and 10. If it's not the correct answer you get another chance, etc.

I can get my script to print correct/not correct one time, but how do I add into this script a possibility for the user to try again (until they guess the right number)?

Here's my basic script, which I'm sure is very simplistic and probably full of errors. Could someone help me sort out this simple problem?

Sorry for the bad layout, but I don't understand how to place my script on this site, sorry!

use strict;
use warnings;

print "Hello, I've thought of a number, do you know what number it is?\n";
sleep (1);
print "Try and guess, type in a number between 1 and 10!\n";
my $div = <STDIN>;
my $i = 0;
my $int = int(rand (10)) + 1;
chomp $div;
if  ($div < $int) {
    print ("The number I though of is higher than $div, try again?\n");
}

if ($div > $int) {
    print ("The number I though of is lower that $div, try again?\n");
}

if ($div == $int) {
    print ("Amazing, you've guessed mt number\n");
}
share|improve this question
1  
You don't have a loop there, though you seem to know that you need a loop. What exactly do you want to know? The syntax of loops? –  Ingo Mar 16 '13 at 12:24
    
I'm going to try out the until loop and see if that's what I need. I guess it is. –  joesh Mar 16 '13 at 13:19
1  
I recently presented a feature-rich implementation of “guess my number” on codereview. You might want to look there for inspiration. –  amon Mar 16 '13 at 13:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The more straightforward approach would be a while loop.

use strict;
use warnings;

print "Hello, I've thought of a number, do you know what number it is?\n";
sleep (1);
my $int = int(rand (10)) + 1;
print "Try and guess, type in a number between 1 and 10!\n";

while (my $div = <STDIN>) {
  chomp $div;
  if  ($div < $int) {
      print "The number I though of is higher than $div, try again?\n";
  } 
  elsif ($div > $int) {
    print "The number I though of is lower that $div, try again?\n";
  }
  else {
    print "Amazing, you've guessed mt number\n";
    last;
  }
}

While (pun intended) your code already is very good (you are using strict and warnings and there are no syntax errors, yay for that!) there are some things I changed, and some more where I would suggest improvement.

But first, let's look at the loop. The program will stay in the while loop as long as the condition is true. Since everything the user can input (even an empty line) is considered true by Perl, this is forever. Which is fine, as there is a condition to exit the loop. It's in the else part of the if. The last statement tells Perl to exit the loop. If the else is not executed, it will go back to the start of the while block and the user has to try again. Forever.

The changes I made: - You don't need $i as you did not use it - You used three seperate if statements. Since only one of the three conditions can be true in this case, I merged them into one - No need for the parens () with print

Suggestions: - You should name your variables for what they do, not what they are. $int is not a good name. I'd go with $random, or even $random_number. Verbosity is important if you have to come back to your code at a later point. - There is a function called say that you can enable with use feature 'say';. It adds say "stuff" as an equivalent to print "stuff\n".


Edit:

If you want to add other conditions that do not directly relate to which number the user has entered, you can add another if.

while (my $div = <STDIN>) {
  chomp $div;

  if ($div eq 'quit') {
    print "You're a sissy... the number was $int. Goodbye.\n";
    last;
  }

  if ($div < $int) {
      print "The number I though of is higher than $div, try again?\n";
  } 
  elsif ($div > $int) {
    print "The number I though of is lower that $div, try again?\n";
  }
  else {
    print "Amazing, you've guessed mt number\n";
    last;
  }
}

You can also add a check to make sure the user has entered a number. Your current code will produce warnings if a word or letter was is entered. To do that, you will need a regular expression. Read up on them in perlre. The m// is the match operator that works together with =~. The \D matches any character that is not a number (0 to 9). next steps over the rest of the while block and begins with the check of the while condition.

while (my $div = <STDIN>) {
  chomp $div;

  if ($div =~ m/\D/) {
    print "You may only guess numbers. Please try again.\n";
    next;
  }

  # ...
}

Thus, the complete check means 'look at the stuff the user has entered, and if there is anything else than a number in it at all, complain and let him try again'.

share|improve this answer
    
That's fantastic, I was - without knowing it - closer than I realised. Thank you very much. I'm having to learn Perl in my university class and sometimes it's a little frustrating as you understand what you have to do, but don't know what 'command' you need to get it done. You helped me solve my problem perfectly, most grateful. I'll re-read your comments again so as to be really clear on this loop. –  joesh Mar 16 '13 at 13:39
    
Just a few comments and questions. a) The 'int' was something I was going to use, and then forgot to take out - a mistake on my part. b) can you use 'if' or 'elsif' more than once? I notice, as you explain, that I didn't need all those 'if' commands. However let's say I wished to add another factor such as 'if' the player hasn't guessed after 10 tries .. then exit loop. Would I just add another 'if' or 'elsif'? c) Yes, you are completely right to add that I should name my variables correctly. The program was originally in French, hence the bad (or confusing) naming of variables. –  joesh Mar 16 '13 at 13:57
    
Which university do you go to that offers Perl? I'd suggest you get the Learning Perl book by Randal L. Schwartz. It's the best one for beginners. Whichever book you get, make sure it is the newest edition. There are a lot of old, outdated things out there. Furthermore, disregard any tutorial you find that does not have strict and warnings or doesn't declare vars with my. Those are way old, and are best ignored. Refer to perl-tutorial.org for a list of high-quality tutorials. –  simbabque Mar 16 '13 at 13:57
1  
Thanks. I'm in Belgium at the UCL in Louvain-la-Neuve. They teach Perl as part of the linguistics section. However, I'm musicologist and hope to use Perl to help me research documents and music score. However, I have to learn it first, hence the simple loop questions! –  joesh Mar 16 '13 at 14:02
    
I got the 'Learning Pearl' book. It's seems excellent, but unfortunately the course (at the Uni) and the book don't always match - i.e. the information isn't given in the same order. –  joesh Mar 16 '13 at 14:03

use an until loop

my $guessed = 0; 
do {
    print "Try and guess, type in a number between 1 and 10!\n";

    my $div = <STDIN>;

    ...;

    if ($div == $int) {

        print ("Amazing, you've guessed mt number\n");
        $guessed = 1;

    }
} until ($guessed)
share|improve this answer
    
Great, I'll try this and see what I can get to happen. If I understand correctly I scrap my original script, which is probably clumsy? –  joesh Mar 16 '13 at 13:18
    
Ok, I back again. Could you explain 'where' I place this loop please. Thanks very much. –  joesh Mar 16 '13 at 13:33

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