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Suppose I have the following two classes:

class Person
{
    public:
        Person(string name, string surname)
            : _name(move(name)), _surname(move(surname)) { }
        ...
    private:
        string _name;
        string _surname;
};

class Student : public Person
{
    public:
        Student(string name, string surname, Schedule schedule)
            : Person(move(name), move(surname)), _schedule(move(schedule)) { }
        ...
    private:
        Schedule _schedule;
};

int main()
{
    Student s("Test", "Subject", Schedule(...));
    ...
    return 0;
}

Is that a good usage of move semantics? As you can see there's a layer of 'move-s' in the Student constructor. Is it possible to avoid the move function call overhead without using const references to forward the parameters to the base constructor?

Or perhaps..should I be using const references whenever I need to forward parameters to the base constructor?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No. You will only get a performance improvement for types which are of a very large size, which is very rare. Absolutely, when dealing with some type which you don't know in advance is very expensive to move, or immovable, then assume cheap moves.

Your existing code is idiomatic C++11, and a perfect forwarding constructor in this respect is wrong and will hideously break things for one parameter to boot.

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Good video for the OP from Going Native 2012 - STL11: Magic && Secrets - Look at the 33:45 mark for passing by value vs reference. –  Captain Obvlious Mar 16 '13 at 14:18
    
@CaptainObvlious will do. Thank you. –  Mihai Bişog Mar 17 '13 at 12:25

Consider favoring code readability and simplicity before choosing to optimize. It is quite likely that you do not really need to save on one copy/move operation, in which case you should favor clarity and simplicity (e.g. take by reference to const).

This said, if you are concerned about the overhead of forwarding your constructor's arguments, you can make your constructor a constructor template and use perfect forwarding to incur minimum overhead no matter whether you are passing an rvalue or an lvalue:

class Person
{
    public:
        template<typename T, typename U>
        Person(T&& name, U&& surname)
            : _name(std::forward<T>(name)), _surname(std::forward<U>(surname)) { }
        ...
    private:
        string _name;
        string _surname;
};

class Student : public Person
{
    public:
        template<typename T, typename U, typename V>
        Student(T&& name, U&& surname, V&& schedule)
            : Person(
                std::forward<T>(name), 
                std::forward<U>(surname)), 
                _schedule(std::forward<V>(schedule)) 
        { }
        ...
    private:
        Schedule _schedule;
};
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2  
What's better about this than the old-school, simple-looking way? –  John Zwinck Mar 16 '13 at 12:47
    
@JohnZwinck: It avoids unnecessary copies/moves –  Andy Prowl Mar 16 '13 at 12:48
3  
The more I see C++ like this, the more I want to use other languages instead. What a nightmare! And I say this as a long-time C++ (and even C++11) user. –  John Zwinck Mar 16 '13 at 12:54
1  
@AndyProwl: I see..thanks for the advice. For my current use case I think I'll just go on with passing by const reference due to the fact that code readability has higher priority. –  Mihai Bişog Mar 16 '13 at 13:10
1  
@JohnZwinck: That's because the code is wrong. –  Puppy Mar 16 '13 at 13:29

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