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Why does the following block of code:

main = do
    line <- getLine
    if null line
        then runTestTT tests
        else do
            line2 <- getLine
            seq::[Int] <- return $ map read $ words line2
            print $ process seq

throw an error:

lgis.hs:28:13:
    Couldn't match type `()' with `Counts'
    Expected type: IO Counts
      Actual type: IO ()
    In a stmt of a 'do' block: print $ process seq
    In the expression:
      do { line2 <- getLine;
           seq :: [Int] <- return $ map read $ words line2;
           print $ process seq }
    In a stmt of a 'do' block:
      if null line then
          runTestTT tests
      else
          do { line2 <- getLine;
               seq :: [Int] <- return $ map read $ words line2;
               print $ process seq }

Even though both:

main = do
    runTestTT tests

and

main = do
    line <- getLine
    line2 <- getLine
    seq::[Int] <- return $ map read $ words line2
    print $ process seq

work fine?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Both branches of an if then else must have the same type, but

runTestTT tests :: IO Counts

and

print $ process seq :: IO ()

You can add a return () to the then branch, the modern way to do that is to use Control.Monad.void,

main = do
    line <- getLine
    if null line
        then void (runTestTT tests)         -- formerly: runTestTT tests >> return ()
        else do
            line2 <- getLine
            seq::[Int] <- return $ map read $ words line2
            print $ process seq

to fix it (or you could add a return some_value_of_type_Counts to the else branch).

share|improve this answer
    
This is what void is for: then void (runTestTT tests) –  Rein Henrichs Jun 10 at 21:14
    
True. Thanks for the heads-up, I haven't yet got used to all the new convenience functions. –  Daniel Fischer Jun 10 at 21:33
    
Is there some way to make a >>-like operator sufficiently polymorphic to deal with this? a>>b doesn't care what type a produces; I would think of it naturally as taking some sort of existentially quantified type, but I don't know if Haskell (or Glasgow Haskell) has the right sort. –  dfeuer Jun 10 at 23:33
    
@dfeuer I'm sorry, I don't understand. In if condition then this else that, the types of this and that must unify. You could of course make something like iffy :: (Monad m) => Bool -> m a -> m b -> m () if that's what you mean. –  Daniel Fischer Jun 10 at 23:44
    
@DanielFischer, that's a perfectly good work-around, but what I was getting at is that it's probably possible (but probably not in Haskell) to unify those types in some sense. m a and m b are each of type exists c . m c or some such. –  dfeuer Jun 11 at 1:05

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