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In old rusty Pascal there were convenient construct to perform a sequence of actions on object or record:

with obj do
begin
  methodCall
  otherMethodCall
  ...
end

I'm trying to touch something similar in scala, but something missing in my head :)

Is it possible to achieve somehow such effect, as if obj was in current scope of passed closure and behaved as this:

{
  import obj._
  callObjMethod(x, y)
  objVal.doSomething()
  ...
}

But in customized syntax like:

doWith (obj) {
  callObjMethod(x, y)
  objVal.doSomething()
}

Intuitionally I feel that it's more no than yes but curiosity wants to know for sure.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

One possibility is the tap method:

def tap[A](obj: A)(actions: (A => _)*) = {
  actions.foreach { _(obj) }
  obj
}

tap(obj) (
  _.callObjMethod(x, y),
  _.objVal.doSomething()
)

or after using enrichment

implicit class RichAny[A](val obj: A) extends AnyVal {
  def tap(actions: (A => _)*) = {
    actions.foreach { _(obj) }
    obj
  }
}

obj.tap (
  _.callObjMethod(x, y),
  _.objVal.doSomething()
)

I think that with macros you should even be able to get your desired syntax (and avoid the overhead of creating the function objects), but I'll leave that to someone else.

share|improve this answer
    
this is pretty neat –  Arg Mar 16 '13 at 14:14
    
Cannot get how underscore becomes reference to object in _.callObjMethod. How? –  dmitry Mar 16 '13 at 14:24
1  
I would call it Kestrel, not RichAny, 'cause it operation comes from combinators. –  om-nom-nom Mar 16 '13 at 14:50
    
@dmitry That's simply a standard shorthand for lambda expressions. _.callObjMethod is the same as x => x.callObjectMethod, and foo(_, x) is the same as y => foo(y, x). –  Alexey Romanov Mar 16 '13 at 15:49
    
@om-nom-nom Yes, that's simply what I called it the last time I defined this class because there were other methods there as well. –  Alexey Romanov Mar 16 '13 at 16:02

Do you mean like this?

val file = new java.io.File(".")

// later as long as file is in scope

{
  import file._
  println(isDirectory)
  println(getCanonicalPath())
}  

You can just use the import keyword to bring the methods of the object in scope.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, i mean this, and this is written in the question by the way. –  dmitry Mar 16 '13 at 22:12
    
This seems like the best answer (though the other one is interesting and worth upvoting). –  sourcedelica Mar 18 '13 at 15:14
    
that's not a best answer at all, just because this technique is layed out in question from the beginning, and I tried to find out how to do something to behave like this. –  dmitry Mar 22 '13 at 15:45
1  
@dmitry oh yeah that is indeed written in the question! Honestly I didn't understand that you already knew the technique even after I read the question 3 times. –  huynhjl Mar 22 '13 at 16:24

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