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My C++ code is as follows:

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class A
{
    public:
        virtual void f(int i)
        {
            cout << "A's f(int)!" << endl;
        }
        void f(int i, int j)
        {
            cout << "A's f(int, int)!" << endl;
        }
};

class B : public A
{
    public:
        virtual void f(int i)
        {
            cout << "B's f(int)!" << endl;
        }
};

int main()
{
    B b;
    b.f(1,2);
    return 0;
}

during compilation I get:

g++ -std=c++11 file.cpp 
file.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
file.cpp:29:9: error: no matching function for call to ‘B::f(int, int)’
file.cpp:29:9: note: candidate is:
file.cpp:20:16: note: virtual void B::f(int)
file.cpp:20:16: note:   candidate expects 1 argument, 2 provided

When I tried to use override after B's f(int), I got the same error.

Is it possible in C++ to override only 1 method? I've been searching for a code example using override that will compile on my machine and haven't found one yet.

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Virtual method causes compilation error in Derived class –  Bo Persson Mar 16 '13 at 15:37
1  
No, sorry, that was another problem. –  Bo Persson Mar 16 '13 at 15:38
    
possible duplicate of C++: rationale behind hiding rule –  Angew Mar 16 '13 at 15:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're overriding the name "f" as a method name. So any overload will be overridden as well.

You could use the using key word, just to tell the compiler to look at the base class as well:

class B : public A
{
    public:
        using A::f;
        virtual void f(int i)
        {
            cout << "B's f(int)!" << endl;
        }
};
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The problem is that your virtual function f() in class B hides A's non-virtual overload with an identical name. You can use a using declaration to bring it into scope:

class B : public A
{
    public:
        using A::f;
    //  ^^^^^^^^^^^

        virtual void f(int i)
        {
            cout << "B's f(int)!" << endl;
        }
};
share|improve this answer

You're being bitten by how name lookup works in C++. The compiler searches through successive scopes until it finds a scope with at least one item with a matching name.

Assuming that item is a function, it then does overload resolution among the functions with that name that it found at that scope. If none of those works, it does not keep searching more scopes to find a better fit.

You can, however, get it to search the parent's class in this case:

class B : public A
{
    public:
        using A::f;
        virtual void f(int i)
        {
            cout << "B's f(int)!" << endl;
        }
};

At first glance, it might appear that the using statement could produce ambiguity. For example, with the using A::f; there are now two f(int) functions visible in B's scope (A::f(int) and B::f(int)). C++ has some rules to cover this as well, so if you add (for example) b.f(3); in main (with the using A::f; in place) you still won't get ambiguity -- it'll call b::f(int) as you'd expect.

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The function f defined in derived class hides the base class functions by the name f.
To bring the hidden function in scope of derived class you need to add:

using A::f;

to your base class definition.

Good Read:

What's the meaning of, Warning: Derived::f(char) hides Base::f(double)?

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Yes, it's possible to override just one method of a class, make it virtual. Non virtual will be shadowed when declared in a inherited class.

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