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I'm trying to find the average value of an array of floating point values using multiple threads on a single machine. I'm not concerned with the size of the array or memory constraints (assume a moderately sized array, large enough to warrant multiple threads). In particular, I'm looking for the most efficient scheduling algorithm. It seems to me that a static block approach would be the most efficient.

So, given that I have x machine cores, it would seem reasonable to chunk the array into array.size/x values and have each core sum the results for their respective array chunk. Then, the summed results from each core are added and the final result is this value divided by the total number of array elements (note: in the case of the # of array elements not being exactly divisible by x, I am aware of the optimization to distribute the elements as evenly as possible across the threads).

The array will obviously be shared between threads, but since there are no writes involved, I won't need to involve any locking mechanisms or worry about synchronization issues.

My question is: is this actually the most efficient approach for this problem?

In contrast, for example, consider the static interleaved approach. In this case, if I had four cores (threads), then thread one would operate on array elements 0, 4, 8, 12... whereas thread two would operate on elements 1, 5, 9, 13... This would seem worse since each core would be continually getting cache misses, whereas the static block approach means that each core operates on success values and takes advantage of data locality. Some tests that I've run seem to back this up.

So, can anyone point out a better approach than static block, or confirm that this is most likely the best approach?

Edit:
I'm using Java and Linux (Ubuntu). I'm trying not to think to much about the language/platform involved, and just look at the problem abstractly from a scheduling point of view that involves manually assigning workload to multiple threads. But I understand that the language and platform are important factors.

Edit-2:
Here's some timings (nano time / 1000) with varying array sizes (doubles).
Sequential timings used a single java thread. The others implemented their respective scheduling strategies using all available (4) cores working in parallel.

1,000,000 elements:
---Sequential
5765
1642
1565
1485
1444
1511
1446
1448
1465
1443
---Static Block
15857
4571
1489
1529
1547
1496
1445
1415
1452
1661
---Static Interleaved
9692
4578
3071
7204
5312
2298
4518
2427
1874
1900

50,000,000 elements:
---Sequential
73757
69280
70255
78510
74520
69001
69593
69586
69399
69665
---Static Block
62827
52705
55393
53843
57408
56276
56083
57366
57081
57787
---Static Interleaved
179592
306106
239443
145630
171871
303050
233730
141827
162240
292421

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Which language are you using and for which platform are you developing? This is an important information to help you. For instance, if you are developing for MAC OS X and using CGD, you don't need to worry about the number of cores or CPU units. –  Jean Mar 16 '13 at 16:35
    
Post is edited... –  RTF Mar 16 '13 at 16:46
    
The size of the array is important. Simple floating point calculation is ridiculously fast, so, unless the data is already in the cpu cache, your bottleneck is memory - because of this, using multiple threads won't give any benefits. –  Karoly Horvath Mar 16 '13 at 16:50
    
I understand. I'm not saying that array size and memory have no bearing in general or even to this particular averaging problem. I'm just saying that I'm not concerned with these aspects with respect to selecting the most efficient scheduling algorithm e.g. static block, static mixed, static interleaved, dynamic mixed etc. –  RTF Mar 16 '13 at 17:12
    
And I'm just saying that in some cases the best scheduler runs a single thread. Would love to here about some measurements you've done. Do extra threads give any boost? –  Karoly Horvath Mar 16 '13 at 17:38
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your system doesn't seem to have the memory bandwidth to take advantage of 4 threads on this problem. Doing floating point addition of elements is just not enough work to keep the CPU busy at the rate memory can deliver data... your 4 cores are sharing the same memory controller/DRAM... and are waiting on memory. You probably will see the same speedup if you use 2 threads instead of 4.

Interleaving is a bad idea, as you said and as you confirmed, why waste precious memory bandwidth bringing data into a core and then only using one fourth of it. If you are lucky and the threads run somewhat in sync then you will get reuse of data in the Level 2 or Level 3 cache, but you will still bring data into the L1 cache and only use a fraction.

Update: when adding 50 million elements one concern is loss of precision, log base 2 of 50 million is about 26 bits, and double precision floating point has 53 effective bits (52 explicit and 1 implied). The best case is when all elements have similar exponents (similar in magnitude). Things get worse if the numbers in the array have a large range of exponents, in the worst case the range is large and they are sorted in descending order of magnitude. Precision of your final average can be improved by sorting the array and adding in ascending order. See this SO question for more insight into the precision problem when adding a large number of items: Find the average within variable number of doubles.

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It looks like you're right about the memory bandwidth issue. Timings are very similar using only 2 threads compared with timings for 4 threads. In any case, it's clear that static block is preferential to interleaved. I'm gonna leave this question hanging for a while longer to see if anyone else has any further thoughts on alternative approaches... –  RTF Mar 17 '13 at 1:33
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