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I have some working php/mysql which I am now migrating to stored procedures.

As soon as any stored procedure is called, subsequent CALLs and SELECTs fail with "Commands out of sync; you can't run this command now".

Existing stored procedures which are not SELECTs work fine.

function db_all ($query)
{
    log_sql_read ($query);
    $result = mysql_query ($query, db_connection ());

    if (!$result)
    {
        log_sql_error ($query);
        return Array ();
    }

    $rows = Array ();

    while ($row = mysql_fetch_assoc ($result))
        array_push ($rows, $row);

    mysql_free_result ($result);

    return $rows;
}

db_all ("SELECT 1 as `test`");
db_all ("SELECT 2 as `test`");
db_all ("CALL `$db`.`select_info`($id);"); // RETURNS CORRECT DATA
db_all ("CALL `$db`.`select_info`($id);"); // ERROR HERE
db_all ("SELECT 5 as `test`");             // ERROR HERE

This error is explained elsewhere as a result of not calling mysql_free_result, but I do call this. So what's wrong?

I'm seeing some solutions which refer to mysqli. I need a non-mysqli solution for now.

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Please would you post the stored procedure. It looks like you're doing something wrong there. –  grahamj42 Mar 16 '13 at 18:48
    
It's a bit complicated but the problem persists with trivial stored procedures. –  spraff Mar 16 '13 at 19:22
    
@spraff The problem is that SP returns two resultsets and you need to consume them both before making another call. See updated answer. –  peterm Mar 16 '13 at 19:27

1 Answer 1

The problem is when executed, a stored procedure will give you two resultsets back. One with the actual resultset and another with the status of the executing. And you need to consume both before making another call that returns result set.

In mysqli_* you can utilize mysqli_multi_query, mysqli_store_result, mysqli_next_result to achieve that. You can see how to do that in mysqlihere.

In your case with mysql_* you can just close the connection after you done fetching results.

function db_all ($query)
{
    $link = db_connection();     //Open connection

    log_sql_read ($query);
    $result = mysql_query ($query, $link);

    if (!$result)
    {
        log_sql_error ($query);
        return Array ();
    }

    $rows = Array ();

    while ($row = mysql_fetch_assoc ($result))
        array_push ($rows, $row);

    mysql_free_result ($result);
    mysql_close($link);          //Close the connection
    return $rows;
}
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