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I have a task to make the following function as precise (the speed is not the aim) as possible. I have to use float and the method of middle rectangles. Could you suggest something? Actually, I think, it's all about minimization of float rounding errors. That's what I've done:

typedef float T;

T integrate(T left, T right, long N, T (*func)(T)) {
    long i = 0;
    T result = 0.0;
    T interval = right - left;
    for(i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        result += func(left + interval * (i + 0.5) / N) * interval / N;
    }
    return result;
}
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1  
result += func(left + interval * (i + 0.5) / N) * interval and return result / N; –  user529758 Mar 16 '13 at 18:47
    
Is that function pointer call necessary? Can it be inlined? –  Mysticial Mar 16 '13 at 18:48
    
@Mysticial yes, it's necessary. But I don't need speed, I need precision, so that's okay. –  o2genum Mar 16 '13 at 18:51
2  
"I have to use float and the method of middle rectangles." - That sounds like a very arbitrary restriction. Is this a homework assignment? –  Mysticial Mar 16 '13 at 18:52
1  
@ValeriAtamaniouk There are two sources of error: (1) the difference between the sum of the areas of the rectangles and the area under the curve (2) floating point rounding error. As N increases, the first source of error decreases, but the second increases because there are more calculations. –  Patricia Shanahan Mar 17 '13 at 3:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are lots of ways you could avoid or compensate for floating-point rounding (MM's suggestion, using Kahan summation, etc...). However, there's no reason to do so, because the rounding errors are absolutely dwarfed by the error of the integration scheme; you won't get a more accurate integral, you'll get a more accurate approximation of the incorrect result computed by the midpoint rule. Any such effort is entirely wasted except in extremely specialized circumstances.

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For N = 18823 relative error is -1,78814E-07 (integrating sin(x) from 0 to Pi). If I change T to double, it's 1,16068E-09. The difference is not great, yes. –  o2genum Mar 16 '13 at 19:06

I have a task to make the following function as precise as possible

You say that you have to use float, so I assume the question isn't about rounding, but rather about computing the integral more accurately.

I also assume that simply increasing N is not an option.

Instead of using the mid-point rule, my suggestion is to consider using a higher-order quadrature rule (trapezoid, Simpson's etc).

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2  
Exactly right. For almost any choice of func, the error due to the integration scheme dominates the error due to floating-point rounding. The only way to significantly improve accuracy is to use a more sophisticated integrator. –  Stephen Canon Mar 16 '13 at 18:52
    
Oh, sorry, I edited question: I have to use the method of middle rectangles. So everything is about floats. How can I recombine them, add, multiply, etc. to make calculations more precise. –  o2genum Mar 16 '13 at 18:55

Try this:

{
   long i = 0;
   T result = 0.0;
   T interval = right - left;
   for(i = 0; i < N; i++) {
       result += func(left + interval * (i + 0.5) / N);
   }
   return result * interval / N;
}
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Doesn't help or helped very little. –  o2genum Mar 16 '13 at 19:00
2  
It is he best you can get, IMO. It is the only thing that can be optimized for accuracy (and perhaps the calcuation of the index, i.e. the i + 0.5 part -- you could use a while loop and increment a float instead of the integer value. But you can't expect too much accuracy with 32 bit floats. –  Rudy Velthuis Mar 17 '13 at 6:37

If you want to compute an integral precisely, go read up on integration schemes. Some home-knit routine won't give any kind of precision

The book "Numerical recipes" (there are several versions, one for C) is highly regarded. Haven't looked at it personally.

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