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The following expression is used in C to get the address of a particular element.

 &a[x]

What is the type of the value returned? What is this dependent on? Is it always the same by convenetion or is it dependent on the operating system?


I need to know this because:

I need to extract a bit pattern from within this pointer so Im trying to understand whether the value is hex or binary. When you say a pointer is it like: 0x25434 or like 0111000111?

Becuase that would affect how I extract my bits

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6  
It's a pointer to a[x].... –  duffymo Mar 16 '13 at 18:52
4  
binary and hex are just two different ways to represent a number. Neither refer to a datatype. –  hvanbrug Mar 16 '13 at 18:53
1  
you've added the C++ tag, whilst your question seems to be focused on C. Which is it? –  didierc Mar 16 '13 at 18:59
    
Correct me if Im wrong, I thought anything with C also applies to C++? hence the tagging –  banditKing Mar 16 '13 at 19:00
    
@banditKing C and C++ are two languages that happen to share a usuable common subset, but C++ is not a superset of C and there are many incompatibilities, even in low-level semantics. –  Stephen Lin Mar 16 '13 at 19:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

For an array of T, the type of the returned value is pointer-to-T, declared as T *:

T a[] = ...;
T *ptr = &a[n];

How this pointer is displayed—in binary, hex, decimal, Morse—is entirely up to the code displaying it. The %p format value is a popular choice for debugging, and it will typically print the pointer's value (the memory address) in hexadecimal.

If the address the pointer points to needs to be expressed as a number, it can be obtained by casting the pointer to the uintptr_t integral type:

uintptr_t addr = (uintptr_t) ptr;

The bits of the address can then be inspected with the usual arithmetic and binary operators.

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I need to extract a bit pattern from within this pointer so Im trying to understand whether the value is hex or binary. When you say a pointer is it like: 0x25434 or like 0111000111? Becuase that would affect how I extract my bits –  banditKing Mar 16 '13 at 18:56
1  
You wrote two different representations of a number. First, a number doesn't have a representation, you only use a representation when writing them. Second, pointers are not numbers, you can convert them to such (to print them) but pointers behave different. Calculating with pointers is called pointer arithmetic and it behaves different than number arithmetic. –  leemes Mar 16 '13 at 18:58
    
@banditKing This is not how numbers work in C. Unlike in scripting languages, a C number is always a number, you cannot observe its digits other than by calculating them from the number using arithmetics. Because of that, bases come into play only when reading or writing out the number. –  user4815162342 Mar 16 '13 at 19:06
    
Pointers might not even be represented as numbers internally...one example (a Lisp machine) is described here –  Stephen Lin Mar 16 '13 at 19:07
    
@StephenLin A conforming C implementation must still be able to convert a pointer to intptr_t or uintptr_t and convert that number back into the original pointer. Of course, the implementation is free to devise completely arbitrary mapping between the pointers and those numbers that has nothing to do with hardware addresses. For example, it could store the pointer objects in a table with the "addresses" being indices into the table. –  user4815162342 Mar 16 '13 at 19:11

if a[] is array of int, it will be int*, for example. If you new to C language, i would recommend you read this book http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_C_Programming_Language

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