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Does anyone know of any good C++ code that does this

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14 Answers 14

I faced the encoding half of this problem the other day. Unhappy with the available options, and after taking a look at this C sample code, i decided to roll my own C++ url-encode function:

#include <cctype>
#include <iomanip>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

string url_encode(const string &value) {
    ostringstream escaped;
    escaped.fill('0');
    escaped << hex;

    for (string::const_iterator i = value.begin(), n = value.end(); i != n; ++i) {
        string::value_type c = (*i);

        // Keep alphanumeric and other accepted characters intact
        if (isalnum(c) || c == '-' || c == '_' || c == '.' || c == '~') {
            escaped << c;
            continue;
        }

        // Any other characters are percent-encoded
        escaped << '%' << setw(2) << int((unsigned char) c);
    }

    return escaped.str();
}

The implementation of the decode function is left as an exercise to the reader. :P

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I believe it's more generic (more generally correct) to replace ' ' with "%20". I've updated the code accordingly; feel free to roll back if you disagree. –  Josh Kelley Jul 15 '14 at 17:48
    
Nah, I agree. Also took the chance to remove that pointless setw(0) call (at the time I thought minimal width would remain set until I changed it back, but in fact it is reset after the next input). –  xperroni Jul 15 '14 at 22:19
    
Actually, this does not convert '+' to space so it fails. –  xryl669 Feb 3 at 8:55
    
Don't you mean it the other way arond – convert space to '+'? Anyway, read the first comment by Josh Kelley, spaces are being converted to '%20' which is just as well. –  xperroni Feb 4 at 2:36

Answering my own question...

libcurl has curl_easy_escape

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string urlDecode(string &SRC) {
    string ret;
    char ch;
    int i, ii;
    for (i=0; i<SRC.length(); i++) {
        if (int(SRC[i])==37) {
            sscanf(SRC.substr(i+1,2).c_str(), "%x", &ii);
            ch=static_cast<char>(ii);
            ret+=ch;
            i=i+2;
        } else {
            ret+=SRC[i];
        }
    }
    return (ret);
}

not the best, but working fine ;-)

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is this flawless? –  hB0 Nov 9 '13 at 7:34
1  
Of course you should use '%' instead of 37. –  John Zwinck May 27 '14 at 13:05
    
This does not convert '+' to space –  xryl669 Feb 3 at 8:55

And source code...

http://www.codeguru.com/cpp/cpp/string/conversions/article.php/c12759

Body must be at least 30 characters

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1  
at the end of the article there's a zipfile which contains the "missing" variables SAFE and HEX2DEC. i was a bit slow to notice so thought they were actually missing and came across this neat way of defining them: pastebin.com/Gke1dNmC –  kritzikratzi Jun 13 '13 at 2:29

CGICC includes methods to do url encode and decode. form_urlencode and form_urldecode

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anything free is good. –  J.J. Sep 30 '08 at 19:29
    
you just sparked a decent conversation in our office with that library. –  J.J. Sep 30 '08 at 19:35
    
This is actually, the simplest and most correct code. –  xryl669 Feb 3 at 8:56

Url encoding/decoding algorithm is not that difficult.

I'd start from the specification:

Url encoding on Wikipedia

If you want pre-cooked code, just search the Internets:

http://www.google.it/search?hl=it&q=Encode+Decode+URLs+in+C%2B%2B&meta=

(yep, that address is url-encoded)

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Adding a follow-up to Bill's recommendation for using libcurl: great suggestion, and to be updated:
after 3 years, the curl_escape function is deprecated, so for future use it's better to use curl_easy_escape.

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I ended up on this question when searching for an api to decode url in a win32 c++ app. Since the question doesn't quite specify platform assuming windows isn't a bad thing.

InternetCanonicalizeUrl is the API for windows programs. More info here

        LPTSTR lpOutputBuffer = new TCHAR[1];
        DWORD dwSize = 1;
        BOOL fRes = ::InternetCanonicalizeUrl(strUrl, lpOutputBuffer, &dwSize, ICU_DECODE | ICU_NO_ENCODE);
        DWORD dwError = ::GetLastError();
        if (!fRes && dwError == ERROR_INSUFFICIENT_BUFFER)
        {
            delete lpOutputBuffer;
            lpOutputBuffer = new TCHAR[dwSize];
            fRes = ::InternetCanonicalizeUrl(strUrl, lpOutputBuffer, &dwSize, ICU_DECODE | ICU_NO_ENCODE);
            if (fRes)
            {
                //lpOutputBuffer has decoded url
            }
            else
            {
                //failed to decode
            }
            if (lpOutputBuffer !=NULL)
            {
                delete [] lpOutputBuffer;
                lpOutputBuffer = NULL;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            //some other error OR the input string url is just 1 char and was successfully decoded
        }

InternetCrackUrl (here) also seems to have flags to specify whether to decode url

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cpp-netlib has functions

namespace boost {
  namespace network {
    namespace uri {    
      inline std::string decoded(const std::string &input);
      inline std::string encoded(const std::string &input);
    }
  }
}

they allow to encode and decode URL strings very easy.

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This version is pure C and can optionally normalize the resource path. Using it with C++ is trivial:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    const std::string src("/some.url/foo/../bar/%2e/");
    std::cout << "src=\"" << src << "\"" << std::endl;

    // either do it the C++ conformant way:
    char* dst_buf = new char[src.size() + 1];
    urldecode(dst_buf, src.c_str(), 1);
    std::string dst1(dst_buf);
    delete[] dst_buf;
    std::cout << "dst1=\"" << dst1 << "\"" << std::endl;

    // or in-place with the &[0] trick to skip the new/delete
    std::string dst2;
    dst2.resize(src.size() + 1);
    dst2.resize(urldecode(&dst2[0], src.c_str(), 1));
    std::cout << "dst2=\"" << dst2 << "\"" << std::endl;
}

Outputs:

src="/some.url/foo/../bar/%2e/"
dst1="/some.url/bar/"
dst2="/some.url/bar/"

And the actual function:

#include <stddef.h>
#include <ctype.h>

/**
 * decode a percent-encoded C string with optional path normalization
 *
 * The buffer pointed to by @dst must be at least strlen(@src) bytes.
 * Decoding stops at the first character from @src that decodes to null.
 * Path normalization will remove redundant slashes and slash+dot sequences,
 * as well as removing path components when slash+dot+dot is found. It will
 * keep the root slash (if one was present) and will stop normalization
 * at the first questionmark found (so query parameters won't be normalized).
 *
 * @param dst       destination buffer
 * @param src       source buffer
 * @param normalize perform path normalization if nonzero
 * @return          number of valid characters in @dst
 * @author          Johan Lindh <johan@linkdata.se>
 * @legalese        BSD licensed (http://opensource.org/licenses/BSD-2-Clause)
 */
ptrdiff_t urldecode(char* dst, const char* src, int normalize)
{
    char* org_dst = dst;
    int slash_dot_dot = 0;
    char ch, a, b;
    do {
        ch = *src++;
        if (ch == '%' && isxdigit(a = src[0]) && isxdigit(b = src[1])) {
            if (a < 'A') a -= '0';
            else if(a < 'a') a -= 'A' - 10;
            else a -= 'a' - 10;
            if (b < 'A') b -= '0';
            else if(b < 'a') b -= 'A' - 10;
            else b -= 'a' - 10;
            ch = 16 * a + b;
            src += 2;
        }
        if (normalize) {
            switch (ch) {
            case '/':
                if (slash_dot_dot < 3) {
                    /* compress consecutive slashes and remove slash-dot */
                    dst -= slash_dot_dot;
                    slash_dot_dot = 1;
                    break;
                }
                /* fall-through */
            case '?':
                /* at start of query, stop normalizing */
                if (ch == '?')
                    normalize = 0;
                /* fall-through */
            case '\0':
                if (slash_dot_dot > 1) {
                    /* remove trailing slash-dot-(dot) */
                    dst -= slash_dot_dot;
                    /* remove parent directory if it was two dots */
                    if (slash_dot_dot == 3)
                        while (dst > org_dst && *--dst != '/')
                            /* empty body */;
                    slash_dot_dot = (ch == '/') ? 1 : 0;
                    /* keep the root slash if any */
                    if (!slash_dot_dot && dst == org_dst && *dst == '/')
                        ++dst;
                }
                break;
            case '.':
                if (slash_dot_dot == 1 || slash_dot_dot == 2) {
                    ++slash_dot_dot;
                    break;
                }
                /* fall-through */
            default:
                slash_dot_dot = 0;
            }
        }
        *dst++ = ch;
    } while(ch);
    return (dst - org_dst) - 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Here it is without the optional path stuff. pastebin.com/RN5g7g9u –  Julian Jun 3 '14 at 4:09
    
This does not follow any recommandation, and is completely wrong compared to what the author asks for ('+' is not replaced by space for example). Path normalization has nothing to do with url decoding. If you intent to normalize your path, you should first split your URL in parts (scheme, authority, path, query, fragment) and then apply whatever algorithm you like only on the path part. –  xryl669 Feb 3 at 9:04

I know you asked about code, but on windows UrlEscape is exported by the windows dll shlwapi.dll

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/bb773774(v=vs.85).aspx

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Had to do it in a project without Boost. So, ended up writing my own. I will just put it on GitHub: https://github.com/corporateshark/LUrlParser

clParseURL URL = clParseURL::ParseURL( "https://name:pwd@github.com:80/path/res" );

if ( URL.IsValid() )
{
    cout << "Scheme    : " << URL.m_Scheme << endl;
    cout << "Host      : " << URL.m_Host << endl;
    cout << "Port      : " << URL.m_Port << endl;
    cout << "Path      : " << URL.m_Path << endl;
    cout << "Query     : " << URL.m_Query << endl;
    cout << "Fragment  : " << URL.m_Fragment << endl;
    cout << "User name : " << URL.m_UserName << endl;
    cout << "Password  : " << URL.m_Password << endl;
}
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[Necromancer mode on]
Stumbled upon this question when was looking for fast, modern, platform independent and elegant solution. Didnt like any of above, cpp-netlib would be the winner but it has horrific memory vulnerability in "decoded" function. So I came up with boost's spirit qi/karma solution.

namespace bsq = boost::spirit::qi;
namespace bk = boost::spirit::karma;
bsq::int_parser<unsigned char, 16, 2, 2> hex_byte;
template <typename InputIterator>
struct unescaped_string
    : bsq::grammar<InputIterator, std::string(char const *)> {
  unescaped_string() : unescaped_string::base_type(unesc_str) {
    unesc_char.add("+", ' ');

    unesc_str = *(unesc_char | "%" >> hex_byte | bsq::char_);
  }

  bsq::rule<InputIterator, std::string(char const *)> unesc_str;
  bsq::symbols<char const, char const> unesc_char;
};

template <typename OutputIterator>
struct escaped_string : bk::grammar<OutputIterator, std::string(char const *)> {
  escaped_string() : escaped_string::base_type(esc_str) {

    esc_str = *(bk::char_("a-zA-Z0-9_.~-") | "%" << bk::right_align(2,0)[bk::hex]);
  }
  bk::rule<OutputIterator, std::string(char const *)> esc_str;
};

The escape function has a flaw, it doesnt add padding zeroes as requested by RFC. Maybe someone here knows how to fix it. The usage of above as following:

std::string unescape(const std::string &input) {
  std::string retVal;
  retVal.reserve(input.size());
  typedef std::string::const_iterator iterator_type;

  char const *start = "";
  iterator_type beg = input.begin();
  iterator_type end = input.end();
  unescaped_string<iterator_type> p;

  if (!bsq::parse(beg, end, p(start), retVal))
    retVal = input;
  return retVal;
}

std::string escape(const std::string &input) {
  typedef std::back_insert_iterator<std::string> sink_type;
  std::string retVal;
  retVal.reserve(input.size() * 3);
  sink_type sink(retVal);
  char const *start = "";

  escaped_string<sink_type> g;
  if (!bk::generate(sink, g(start), input))
    retVal = input;
  return retVal;
}

[Necromancer mode off]

EDIT01: fixed the zero padding stuff - special thanks to Hartmut Kaiser
EDIT02: Live on CoLiRu

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Ordinarily adding '%' to the int value of a char will not work when encoding, the value is supposed to the the hex equivalent. e.g '/' is '%2F' not '%47'.

I think this is the best and concise solutions for both url encoding and decoding (No much header dependencies).

string urlEncode(const char* chars)
{
    string new_str="";
    char c;
    char bufHex[10];
    int len=strlen(chars);

    for(int i=0;i<len;i++)
    {
        c=chars[i];
        if (isalnum(c) || c == '-' || c == '_' || c == '.' || c == '~')new_str+=c;
        else
        {
             sprintf(bufHex,"%X",c);
             new_str+="%";
             new_str+=bufHex;
        }
    }
    return new_str;
 }

string urlDecode(string str)
{
    string ret;
    char ch;
    int i, ii,len=str.length();

    for (i=0; i<len; i++) 
    {
        if (str[i]!='%')ret+=str[i];
        else
        {
            sscanf(str.substr(i+1,2).c_str(), "%x", &ii);
            ch=static_cast<char>(ii);
            ret+=ch;
            i=i+2;
        }
    }
    return ret;
}
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