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Say I have something along the lines of

void init(void){
    int foo = 0;
}
void useFoo(void){
    foo++;
}
void main{
    init();
    useFoo();
}

Where we have an init function that initializes one (or more) variables, and then another function (or, potentially, multiple functions) that have to use that variable, how do I make "int foo" visible to those other functions?

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That would be what function-parameters are for, or did I completely fly off the radar? And that variable belongs in main(); not init() –  WhozCraig Mar 16 '13 at 19:30

3 Answers 3

You can make it visible on global scope:

int foo;

void init()
{
    foo = 0;
}

void useFoo()
{
    ++foo;
}

Also you can pass a pointer to variable where it is needed:

void init(int *foo)
{
    *foo = 0;
}

void useFoo(int *foo)
{
    (*foo)++;
}

...
int foo;
init(&foo);
useFoo(&foo);

Or you can use thread-local storage, files, other media, but I believe you don't want that :)

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The short answer is "you can't" (at least not that way). The variable foo in init is created at entry to init, then destroyed on return from init. It no longer exists by the call to useFoo.

You need the variable to have a longer "storage duration" (program-level lifetime). You can do that by making it have "static duration" (via the static keyword and moving it outside of the function—although actually, moving it out suffices), in which case there is only once instance (a "singleton" in many other languages' taxonomies). Alternatively, you can build a data structure that you create using malloc, giving the data "allocated duration": it lasts from the point of the malloc until a later free (we'll ignore realloc for now :-) ).

The allocated-duration method is more cumbersome but more flexible.

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the simplies way is making it a global variable:

int foo;
void init(void) {
    foo = 0;
}
void useFoo(void) {
    foo++;
}
void main(void) {
    init();
    useFoo();
}

Another way is by using the pointer:

#include <stdio.h>

void init(int *foo) {
    *foo = 0;
}
void useFoo(int *foo) {
    (*foo)++;
}
void main(void) {
    int foo;
    init(&foo);
    useFoo(&foo);
    useFoo(&foo);
    useFoo(&foo);
    printf("%d\n", foo);
}

And the last one is passing it as a reference (when using CPP, not C):

#include <stdio.h>

void init(int &foo) {
    foo = 0;
}
void useFoo(int &foo) {
    foo++;
}
int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    int foo;
    init(foo);
    useFoo(foo);
    useFoo(foo);
    useFoo(foo);
    printf("%d\n", foo);
    return 0;
}
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