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I am working on a project in which I need to measure Total Time taken by program and average time taken by program. And that program is a Multithreaded program.

In that program, each thread is working in a particular range. Input parameters is Number of Threads and Number of Task.

If number of threads is 2 and number of tasks is 10 then each thread will be performing 10 tasks. So that means 2 thread will be doing 20 tasks.

So that means-

First thread should be using id between 1 and 10 and second thread should be using id between 11 and 20.

I got the above scenario working. Now I want to measure what is the total time and average time taken by all the threads. So I got the below setup in my program.

Problem Statement:-

Can anyone tell me the way I am trying to measure the Total time and Average time taken by all the threads is correct or not in my below program?

//create thread pool with given size
ExecutorService service = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(noOfThreads);

long startTime = 0L;
try {

    readPropertyFiles();

    startTime = System.nanoTime();

    // queue some tasks
    for (int i = 0, nextId = startRange; i < noOfThreads; i++, nextId += noOfTasks) {

        service.submit(new XMPTask(nextId, noOfTasks, tableList));
    }

    service.shutdown();
    service.awaitTermination(Long.MAX_VALUE, TimeUnit.DAYS);

} finally {
    long estimatedTime = System.nanoTime() - startTime;
    logTimingInfo(estimatedTime, noOfTasks, noOfThreads);
}



private static void logTimingInfo(long elapsedTime, int noOfTasks, int noOfThreads) {

    long timeInMilliseconds = elapsedTime / 1000000L;
    float avg = (float) (timeInMilliseconds) / noOfTasks * noOfThreads;

    LOG.info(CNAME + "::" + "Total Time taken " + timeInMilliseconds + " ms. And Total Average Time taken " + avg + " ms");
}
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3 Answers

service.submit is getting executed only noOfThreads times. XMPTask object is created the same number of times.

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The time you measure is not the consumed time but the elapsed time.

If the program tested (the JVM) is the only one on the computer, it may be relatively accurate but in a real world a lot of process runs concurrently.

I have already done this job by using a native call to the OS, on Windows (I'll complete this post Monday at my office) and Linux (/proc).

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Just FYI, The above program, I will be running in a machine that is dedicated only to me for our LNP Testing. –  AKIWEB Mar 16 '13 at 21:07
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I think you would need to measure the time within the task class itself (XMPTask). Within that task you should be able to extract the id of the thread that is executing it and log that. Using this approach will require reading the logs and doing some calculations on them.

Another approach would be to keep running totals and averages as time progresses. To do this you could write a simple class that is passed into each task that has some static (per jvm) variables for tracking what each thread is doing. Then you could have a single thread outside the Threadpool that did the calculations. So if you wanted to report the average cpu time for each thread every second, this calculation thread could sleep for a second, then calculate and log all the average times, then sleep for a second....

EDIT: After re-reading the requirements, you don't need a background thread, but not sure if we are tracking the average time per thread or average time per task. I have assumed total time and average time per thread and fleshed out the idea in code below. It has not been tested or debugged but should give you a good idea of how to start:

public class Runner
{
    public void startRunning()
    {
        // Create your thread pool
        ExecutorService service = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(noOfThreads);

        readPropertyFiles();

        MeasureTime measure = new MeasureTime();

        // queue some tasks
        for (int i = 0, nextId = startRange; i < noOfThreads; i++, nextId += noOfTasks) 
        {

            service.submit(new XMPTask(nextId, noOfTasks, tableList, measure));
        }

        service.shutdown();
        service.awaitTermination(Long.MAX_VALUE, TimeUnit.DAYS);
        measure.printTotalsAndAverages();
    }
}

public class MeasureTime
{
    HashMap<Long, Long> threadIdToTotalCPUTimeNanos = new HashMap<Long, Long>();
    HashMap<Long, Long> threadIdToStartTimeMillis = new HashMap<Long, Long>();
    HashMap<Long, Long> threadIdToStartTimeNanos = new HashMap<Long, Long>();

    private void addThread(Long threadId)
    {
        threadIdToTotalCPUTimeNanos.put(threadId, 0L);
        threadIdToStartTimeMillis.put(threadId, 0L);
    }

    public void startTimeCount(Long threadId)
    {
        synchronized (threadIdToStartTimeNanos)
        {
            if (!threadIdToStartTimeNanos.containsKey(threadId))
            {
                addThread(threadId);
            }

            long nanos = System.nanoTime();
            threadIdToStartTimeNanos.put(threadId, nanos);
        }
    }

    public void endTimeCount(long threadId)
    {
        synchronized (threadIdToStartTimeNanos)
        {
            long endNanos = System.nanoTime();
            long startNanos = threadIdToStartTimeNanos.get(threadId);

            long nanos = threadIdToTotalCPUTimeNanos.get(threadId);
            nanos = nanos + (endNanos - startNanos);
            threadIdToTotalCPUTimeNanos.put(threadId, nanos);
        }
    }

    public void printTotalsAndAverages()
    {
        long totalForAllThreadsNanos = 0L;
        int numThreads = 0;
        long totalWallTimeMillis = 0;
        synchronized (threadIdToStartTimeNanos)
        {
            numThreads = threadIdToStartTimeMillis.size();
            for (Long threadId: threadIdToStartTimeNanos.keySet())
            {
                totalWallTimeMillis += System.currentTimeMillis() - threadIdToStartTimeMillis.get(threadId);
                long totalCPUTimeNanos = threadIdToTotalCPUTimeNanos.get(threadId);

                totalForAllThreadsNanos += totalCPUTimeNanos;
            }
        }

        long totalCPUMillis = (totalForAllThreadsNanos)/1000000;
        System.out.println("Total milli-seconds for all threads: " + totalCPUMillis);
        double averageMillis = totalCPUMillis/numThreads;
        System.out.println("Average milli-seconds for all threads: " + averageMillis);

        double averageCPUUtilisation = totalCPUMillis/totalWallTimeMillis;
        System.out.println("Average CPU utilisation for all threads: " + averageCPUUtilisation);
    }
}

public class XMPTask implements Callable<String>
{
    private final MeasureTime measure; 

    public XMPTask(// your parameters first
            MeasureTime measure)
    {
        // Save your things first

        this.measure = measure;
    }

    @Override
    public String call() throws Exception
    {
        measure.startTimeCount(Thread.currentThread().getId());

        try
        {
            // do whatever work here that burns some CPU.
        }
        finally
        {
            measure.endTimeCount(Thread.currentThread().getId());
        }

        return "Your return thing";
    }
}

After writing all this, there is one thing that seems a bit strange in that the XMPTask seems to know too much about the list of tasks, when, I think you should just create an XMPTask for every task that you have, give it enough information to do the job, and submit them to the service as you create them.

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Thanks hack_on for the suggestion. Your second approach is a good idea. Can you provide me a simple example of this for your second approach.? Thanks for the help. –  AKIWEB Mar 16 '13 at 21:17
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