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I already know that apply and call are similar functions which sets this (context of a function).

The difference is with : how we send the arguments (manual vs array)

But when should I use the bind() method ?

   var obj = {
      x: 81,
      getX: function() { return this.x; }
    };



    alert(obj.getX.bind(obj)());
    alert(obj.getX.call(obj));
    alert(obj.getX.apply(obj));

jsbin

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9  
Just a comment, it's very funny how a 20k rep user has 4 upvotes and 20+ views in 7min on this simple question whereas a user with 100 rep will probably has a comment saying: possible duplicate : stackoverflow.com/questions/2236747/bind-method-of-javascript :) –  Gabriel Llamas Mar 16 '13 at 21:51
2  
@GabrielLlamas look at the link you provided....it seems the OP meant to jquery's bind method. ( also the answers there presume it) –  Royi Namir Mar 16 '13 at 21:54
1  
It's not your fault if there are users that look at the OP's reputation points before posting an answer or upvoting :) –  Gabriel Llamas Mar 16 '13 at 21:56
    
@GabrielLlamas my 20k is pretty low reputation... –  Royi Namir Mar 16 '13 at 22:02
    
call and apply call a function while bind creates a function. Though with call() you pass arguments individually and apply() as an argument array. For more details check out the linked documentation which should be able to completely answer your question. –  François Wahl Mar 16 '13 at 22:15
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3 Answers

up vote 34 down vote accepted

When you want that function to later be called with a certain context, useful in events.

Call/apply call the function immediately, whereas bind returns a function that when later executed will have the correct context set for calling the original function. This way you can maintain context in async callbacks, and events.

I do this a lot:

function MyObject(element) {
    this.elm = element;

    element.addEventListener('click', this.onClick.bind(this), false);
};

MyObject.prototype.onClick = function(e) {
     var t=this;  //do something with [t]...
    //without bind the context of this function wouldn't be a MyObject
    //instance as you would normally expect.
};

I use it extensively in node.js for async callbacks that I want to pass a member method for, but still want the context to be the instance that started the async action.

A simple, naive implementation of bind would be like:

Function.prototype.bind = function(ctx) {
    var fn = this;
    return function() {
        fn.apply(ctx, arguments);
    };
};

There is more to it (like passing other args), but you can read more about it and see the real implementation on the MDN.

Hope this helps.

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1  
so it stick the context for a future use and not invoking it where as call/apply is invoking immediatly as it called...right? –  Royi Namir Mar 16 '13 at 21:48
1  
@RoyiNamir that is correct, you can use the returned "bound" function later, and the context will be maintained. –  Chad Mar 16 '13 at 21:50
1  
So technically I could use function (){this.onClick.apply(this)}) indtead of bind....no ? –  Royi Namir Mar 16 '13 at 21:58
2  
That is exactly what bind returns. –  Chad Mar 16 '13 at 22:10
3  
You can also use bind for partials, passing in arguments before the function is called. –  gumballhead Mar 16 '13 at 22:29
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It allows to set the value for this independent of how the function is called. This is very useful when working with callbacks:

  function sayHello(){
    alert(this.message);
  }

  var obj = {
     message : "hello"
  };
  setTimeout(sayHello.bind(obj), 1000);

To achieve the same result with call would look like this:

  function sayHello(){
    alert(this.message);
  }

  var obj = {
     message : "hello"
  };
  setTimeout(function(){sayHello.call(obj)}, 1000);
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1  
and the difference between it to call/apply is....? –  Royi Namir Mar 16 '13 at 21:46
1  
Usage of .bind() like you've showed before is incorrect. When you use fn.bind(obj) other function will be returned (not that you've create before). And there are no abilities to change value of this inside of binded function. Mostly this is used for callbacks this insurance. But in yours example - there are no differences in result. But fn !== fn.bind(obj); Notice that. –  InviS Mar 16 '13 at 21:54
    
@FrançoisWahl Didn't I already write it myself at the question ??? also notice the question title : (call && apply) vs bind...which means i know what call and apply do. The prob is the differences between them to Bind. –  Royi Namir Mar 20 '13 at 7:54
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First read this to understand what "this" means in javascript. Then read this to distinguish them.

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