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I'm working on a MUD (Multi User Dungeon) in Python and am just now getting around to the point where I need to add some rooms, enemies, items, etc. I could hardcode all this in, but it seems like this is more of a job for a database.

However, I've never really done any work with databases before so I was wondering if you have any advice on how to set this up?

  • What format should I store the data in?
    • I was thinking of storing a Dictionary object in the database for each entity. In htis way, I could then simply add new attributes to the database on the fly without altering the columns of the database. Does that sound reasonable?
  • Should I store all the information in the same database but in different tables or different entities (enemies and rooms) in different databases.

  • I know this will be a can of worms, but what are some suggestions for a good database? Is MySQL a good choice?

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Top level result on Googling "mud database schema" is Experts Exchange. Here's hoping after a couple of days it will be StackOverflow! –  DVK Oct 9 '09 at 19:23
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Also, I'd like to personally welcome you to the wonderful hell that is MUD development. Lots more fun than playing the darned things, from what I recall of my disreputable MUD past (I coded a C MUD that my friend ran) –  DVK Oct 9 '09 at 19:25
    
I like some MUDs, but I think developing one would be a lot of fun. –  samoz Oct 9 '09 at 21:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

1) There's almost never any reason to have data for the same application in different databases. Not unless you're a Fortune500 size company (OK, i'm exaggregating).

2) Store the info in different tables.

As an example:

  • T1: Rooms

  • T2: Room common properties (aplicable to every room), with a row per *room

  • T3: Room unique properties (applicable to minority of rooms, with a row per property per room - thos makes it easy to add custom properties without adding new columns

  • T4: Room-Room connections

    Having T2 AND T3 is important as it allows you to combine efficiency and speed of row-per-room idea where it's applicable with flexibility/maintanability/space saving of attribute-per-entity-per-row (or Object/attribute/value as IIRC it's called in fancy terms) schema

Good discussion is here

3) Implementation wise, try to write something re-usable, e.g. have generic "Get_room" methods, which underneath access the DB -= ideally via transact SQL or ANSI SQL so you can survive changing of DB back-end fairly painlessly.

For initial work, you can use SQLite. Cheap, easy and SQL compatible (the best property of all). Install is pretty much nothing, DB management can be done by freeware tools or even FireFox plugin IIRC (all of FireFox 3 data stores - history, bookmarks, places, etc... - are all SQLite databases).

For later, either MySQL or Postgres (I don't do either one professionally so can't recommend one). IIRC at some point Sybase had free personal db server as well, but no idea if that's still the case.

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  • This technique is called entity-attribute-value model. It's normally preferred to have DB schema that reflects the structure of the objects, and update the schema when your object structure changes. Such strict schema is easier to query and it's easier to make sure that the data is correct on the database level.
  • One database with multiple tables is the way to do.
  • If you want a database server, I've recommend PostgreSQL. MySQL has some advantages, like easy replication, but PostgreSQL is generally nicer to work with. If you want something smaller that works directly with the application, SQLite is a good embedded database.
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Storing an entire object (serialized/encoded) as a value in the database is bad for querying - I am sure that some queries in your mud will NOT need to know 100% of attributes, or may retrieve a list of object by a value of attributes.

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it seems like this is more of a job for a database

True, although 'database' doesn't have to mean 'relational database'. Most existing MUDs store all data in memory, and read it in from flat-file saved in a plain-text data format. I'm not necessarily recommending this route, just pointing out that a traditional database is by no means necessary. If you do want to go the relational route, recent versions of Python come with sqlite which is a lightweight embedded relational database with good SQL support.

Using relational databases with your code can be awkward. Any change to a game logic class can require a parallel change to the database, and changes to the code that read and write to the database. For this reason good planning will help you a lot, but it's hard to plan a good database schema without experience. At least get your entity classes planned first, then build a database schema around it. Reading up on normalizing a database and understanding the principles there will help.

You may want to use an 'object-relational mapper' which can simplify a lot of this for you. Examples in Python include SQLObject, SQLAlchemy, and Autumn. These hide a lot of the complexities for you, but as a result can hide some of the important details too. I'd recommend using the database directly until you are more familiar with it, and consider using an ORM in the future.

I was thinking of storing a Dictionary object in the database for each entity. In htis way, I could then simply add new attributes to the database on the fly without altering the columns of the database. Does that sound reasonable?

Unfortunately not - if you do that, you waste 99% of the capabilities of the database and are effectively using it as a glorified data store. However, if you don't need aforementioned database capabilities, this is a valid route if you use the right tool for the job. The standard shelve module is well worth looking at for this purpose.

Should I store all the information in the same database but in different tables or different entities (enemies and rooms) in different databases.

One database. One table in the database per entity type. That's the typical approach when using a relational database (eg. MySQL, SQL Server, SQLite, etc).

I know this will be a can of worms, but what are some suggestions for a good database? Is MySQL a good choice?

I would advise sticking with sqlite until you're more familiar with SQL. Otherwise, MySQL is a reasonable choice for a free game database, as is PostGreSQL.

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One database. Each database table should refer to an actual data object.

For instance, create a table for all items, all creatures, all character classes, all treasures, etc.

Spend some time now and figure out how objects will relate to each other, as this will affect your database structure. For example, can a character have more than one character class? Can monsters have character classes? Can monsters carry items? Can rooms have more than one monster?

It seems pedantic, but you'll save yourself a whole lot of trouble early by figuring out what database objects "belong" to which other database objects.

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