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I need to compare two lists in Python, and I know about using the set command to find similar items, but is there a another command I could use that would automatically compare them, instead of having to code for it?

Update

I would like to find the items that aren't in each one. Say list one is as follows:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6] 

and list two is:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 6]

I want to find that 5 is missing from the list, hopefully by a command, but I do know how to loop through comparing

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closed as not a real question by Martijn Pieters, Fredrik Pihl, JBernardo, oefe, Graviton Mar 30 '13 at 2:23

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
What do you need to compare? Do you need to find the matching items? What exactly do you need to do? –  Josh Smeaton Mar 16 '13 at 23:01
3  
Ugh, no need to vote to close yet. Give OP a chance to modify the question and provide context. –  Josh Smeaton Mar 16 '13 at 23:03
    
I mean I would like to find the items that aren't in each one. Say list one is as follows: [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6] and list two is: [1, 2, 3, 4, 6]. I want to find that 5 is missing from the list, hopefully by a command, but I do know how to loop through comparing –  RPi Awesomeness Mar 16 '13 at 23:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Looks like you need symmetric difference:

a = [1,2,3]
b = [3,4,5]

print(set(a)^set(b))


>>> [1,2,4,5]
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The docs are a good place to start. Here are a couple examples that might help you determine how you want to compare your sets.

To find the intersection (items that are in both sets):

>>> a = set([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6])
>>> b = set([4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])
>>> a & b
set([4, 5, 6])

To find the difference (items that only in one set):

>>> a = set([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6])
>>> b = set([4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])
>>> a - b
set([1, 2, 3])
>>> b - a
set([7, 8, 9])

To find the symmetric difference (items that are in one or the other, but not both):

>>> a = set([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6])
>>> b = set([4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])
>>> a ^ b
set([1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9])

Hope that helps.

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Thank you! I will remember this and upvote it when I get 15 rep-things, it is a **very** well done post. Thanks! –  RPi Awesomeness Mar 16 '13 at 23:15
1  
Is this really Python output? The last example is wrong, there are chevrons where I don't think there would be in the console, and I'm a little surprised at the (admittedly arbitrary) displayed set order for set([7, 8, 9]). –  DSM Mar 16 '13 at 23:18
    
My Ctrl-V was a little >>> happy. Fixed. –  Seth Mar 17 '13 at 18:49
    
If you typed a - b on the console and got set([1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9]) then your interpreter is seriously broken. Are you saying that you copied and pasted the above? –  DSM Mar 17 '13 at 21:08
    
Yeah, typo. That was supposed to be a ^. –  Seth Mar 17 '13 at 21:16

A simple list comprehension

In [1]: a=[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6] 

In [2]: b=[1, 2, 3, 4, 6]

In [3]: [i for i in a if i not in b]
Out[3]: [5]
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This finds items in a that are not in b, rather than finding items not in each.. so is the difference but not symmetric difference. –  Spaceghost Mar 17 '13 at 19:35
    
@Spaceghost - true. I just used OPs example straight off –  Fredrik Pihl Mar 17 '13 at 19:36
    
OP asked for items not in each one.. otherwise, would have upvoted this. –  Spaceghost Mar 17 '13 at 19:45

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