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Goal: To change a image on a form when either udp or tcp uses its send method

Problem: I have no idea how to get the event, eventhandler and delegates set up correctly

Send Interface

interface ISendData
{
  void Send();
}

Tcp Connection class

//Need some type of delegate??

public class TCPconnection : ISendData
{
   void Send()
   {
     //how invoke/fire a send Event?
   }
}

UDP Connection class

//Need some type of delegate??

public class UDPConnection : ISendData
{
   void Send()
   {
     //how invoke/fire a send event?
   }
}

the winform which 'should' subscribe to seeing the fired events

public class myForm
{
   private DataWatcher datawatcher = new DataWatcher();
   private Image statusIndicator = null;

   public myform()
   {
     initComponents();

     datawatcher.DataSendActive += new DataWatcherSendHandler(DataSending);
     datawatcher.DataSendInactive += new DataWatcherSendHandler(NoDataSending);
   }

   public void DataSending(object sender, DataWatcherArgs e)
   {
      statusIndicator = Properties.resources.greenLight;
   }

   public void NoDataSending(object sender, DataWatcherArgs e)
   {
      statusIndicator = Properties.resources.redLight;
   }

}

The Event/Event handler?? But I really have no Idea what I'm doing here to make this work

 public delegate void EventHandler(object sender, EventArgs e);

    class DataWatcher
    {
        public event EventHandler DataSendActive;
        public event EventHandler DataSendInactive;

        protected virtual void onDataSendActive(System.EventArgs e)
        {
            if (DataSendActive != null)
            {
                DataSendActive(this, e);
            }
        }
        protected virtual void onDataSendInactive(System.EventArgs e)
        {
            if (DataSendInactive != null)
            {
                DataSendInactive(this, e);
            }
        }
     }
share|improve this question
1  
Can you clarify please ? As I read it, you want to change the image, when any part of your application starts sending/uploading data. Is that correct ? –  Madushan Mar 17 '13 at 1:13
    
@Madushan Yes that is exactly correct. –  stackoverflow Mar 17 '13 at 1:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are many conventions used to do this. Here's my little implementation.

public enum ActivityState
{
    Sending,
    Receiving,
    Idle
}

public interface IDataTransferManager
{
    // This event will fire when the activity state changes.
    // note that Action<T> is introduced in .NET 3.5
    // if you're using .NET 2.0, you can use a delegate.
    event Action<ActivityState> DataActivityStateChange;


    void Send(byte[] data);
    //byte[] Receive(); 
    // ... more methods ... //

}

Now the TcpConnection class will implement this.

public class TcpConnection : IDataTransferManager
{
    public event Action<ActivityState> DataActivityStateChange;

    public void Send(byte[] data)
    {
        // we're sending data. fire the change event
        FireDataActivityStateChange(ActivityState.Sending);

        //TODO: send the data

        // we're done sending. Fire the change event
        FireDataActivityStateChange(ActivityState.Idle);
    }



    private void FireDataActivityStateChange(ActivityState state)
    {
        // helper method, so I don't have to check the event 
        // to avoid null reference exceptions.
        if (DataActivityStateChange != null)
            DataActivityStateChange(state);
    }

}

Here's the setup for your Form.

class MyForm // :Form
{
    IDataTransferManager dataManager;

    public MyForm()
    {   // here, usually an instance will be passed in, 
        // so there's only one instance throughout the application.
        // let's new up an instance for explanation purposes.
        dataManager = new TcpConnection();

        dataManager.DataActivityStateChange += (state) => 
        {
            // NOTE: if you don't like inline, 
            // you can point this labda to a method.

            switch (state)
            {
                case ActivityState.Sending:
                    // change the image to the spinning toilet ball
                    break;
                case ActivityState.Receiving:
                    // change the image to the spinning toilet ball, but reverse :P
                    break;
                case ActivityState.Idle:
                    // hide it ?
                    break;
            }
        };
    }
}

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
In reality, the implementation of IDataTransferManager will support queuing multiple send/receive requests but firing the event only when the state is changed since the last event. It would also do the send/receive operations outside of the UI thread. But I hope this example explains the basics. –  Madushan Mar 17 '13 at 2:47
    
This seems like a good approach but theres one problem. My class (the winform subscribing/listening for these events to happen) isn't instantiating either of these connection classes (UDP, TCP) These classses become instances in other classes. I just need to be able to listen the events whenever they go off. I think i would need sometype of event broker –  stackoverflow Mar 17 '13 at 5:39
1  
As I mentioned in the comments of the Form constructor, the instance of the IDataTransferManager should be passed into the constructor. I wrote the example with Dependency Injection pattern in mind. Although you're free to use any other pattern. As they say, your Form 'depends' on who ever instantiates it to provide an instance of IDataTransferManager. So you have to architect the application in a way, so the caller of the Form constructor knows and provides the instance. –  Madushan Mar 17 '13 at 9:24
    
What if I were to make both UDP and TCP class methods static? This would eleviate the class from having to instantiate an instance. How would this effect the event publisher and subscribers interaction ? –  stackoverflow Mar 17 '13 at 17:33
1  
Yes, although making those classes static also means that, the Form has to decide which is in use. Also, you won't get the benefit of using an interface or inheritance, which allow you to extend the functionality using a subclass in the future. It is up to you, but I recommend you have a look at dependency injection pattern, which helps you overcome these issues. –  Madushan Mar 17 '13 at 19:33

Here is a simple example of how you could implement an event for sending and not sending and subscribe to it

public class Connection
{
    //Set up an event
    public event EventHandler DataSending;
    public event EventHandler DataNotSending

    //This method will trigger the event for sending
    private void OnDataSending()
    {
        if (DataSending!= null) { DataSending(this, EventArgs.Empty); }
    }

    //this method will trigger the event for finished sending
    private void OnDataNotSending()
    {
        if (DataNotSending!= null) { DataNotSending(this, EventArgs.Empty); }
    }

    //This method performs your send logic
    public void Send()
    {
         //Call your method that tells the event to be raised
         OnDataSending();
         //Then put your send code
         OnDataNotSending(); //we're done!

    }
}

This is how you use it in a consuming program

public class myForm
{
     //This method is the one that sets up the 
     //instance and subscribes to the event
     public myForm()
     {
         Connection con = new Connection();

         con.DataSending += new EventHandler(con_DataSending);
         con.DataNotSending += new EventHander(con_DataNotSending);

     }

     void con_DataSending(object sender, EventArgs e)
     {
         //Put your subscription logic here.
         //Whatever you want to do in response to a send
     }

     void con_DataNotSending(object sender, EventArgs e)
     {
         //Put your subscription logic here.
         //Respond to it not sending
     }
}
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