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So, I wish to program a game in Java, but be able to post it on online video gaming websites. For some reason, most game websites do not support the use of .jar files, so I sadly cannot just publish that. However, I have seen one method that works, but I need an explanation to what it is, and how to do it. Some Java games appear to be put on an independent website, then an SWF loads the page, like a browser. For example, Runescape on Kongregate seems to run like this, despite the actual game being written in Java.

Is this a known method? Does anyone have any idea on how to do this? Please, I'd really like my game written in Java, not ActionScript. I can't imagine running Java from an SWF similar to how a browser does it is that hard. Thanks.

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It is not possible to "run a Java game inside an SWF". What yo see happen with Runescape on Kongregate must be something else, not Java running inside a swf. –  Lars Blåsjö Mar 17 '13 at 20:34
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Runescape uses their own version of Java web start to play the game. When you first play Runescape, Jagex uses Java web start to load Java code to your computer that loads the rest of the game. That's what the update check does every time you play.

You can write your Java application so that it uses Java web start. You have to provide a URL on a web page so that the user's browser can download your code to their computer.

Your other choice is to write a Java applet. An applet is run from a web page. The web page has applet HTML to start the applet.

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I presume Flash isn't involved here as OP suggested then? –  HXCaine Mar 17 '13 at 1:22
    
I don't know how Kongregate displays Runescape. I do know how Runescape works. –  Gilbert Le Blanc Mar 17 '13 at 23:42
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