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I am an experienced socket-level programmer in C++, but I do not understand what happens at the IP network level when a socket connection is left open (vs. being closed by calling the close function on the socket from within code).

I have studied the IP header and tried to understand if leaving a socket open has any implications at the IP level.

At the TCP level, leaving a socket open could make sense to me, because perhaps that means the "sequence number" field in the TCP header continues to increment. However, that would be a purely endpoint-based implementation, and therefore could not cut down on transit time for TCP packets. It is my understanding that leaving a connection open generally means that transit time between endpoints across the internet is decreased for packets.

The question is, does it mean anything at the IP level to leave a socket connection open?

The best guess I have is that if a socket connection remains open, that intervening gateways along the complete IP network path will attempt to leave an entry in their mapping table so that the next hop can be executed immediately, without needing to do a broadcast to all connected gateways in order to determine the next hop.

(Perhaps the overhead of DNS lookup is also avoided in this fashion.)

Am I correct in guessing that "leaving a connection open" corresponds to map entries remaining in place on intermediate IP gateways (which speeds up packet transfer)?

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I notice a "close vote" in place. However, I looked through all StackExchange sites, and there is no "networking" site. Is there a recommendation for another StackExchange site that is more appropriate? –  Dan Nissenbaum Mar 17 '13 at 4:42

3 Answers 3

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Direct answer: No.

Your question suggests that you don't fully understand the purpose of TCP, which is to establish a data stream between two hosts. Keeping that in mind, the purpose of leaving a connection open should be obvious: if you close the connection, the stream will end.

The status of a TCP connection is not visible on the IP level; it's only of relevance to TCP. With the exception of NAT gateways, intermediate hosts do not generally keep track of the status of TCP connections passing through them. (In many cases, it'd be impossible for them to do so -- large routers have far more connections running through them than they could possibly track.)

The best guess I have is that if a socket connection remains open, that intervening gateways along the complete IP network path will attempt to leave an entry in their mapping table so that the next hop can be executed immediately, without needing to do a broadcast to all connected gateways in order to determine the next hop.

This guess is incorrect. A router will have some sort of algorithm for picking a route based on the destination IP, based on a set of routing tables it keeps internally. Read up on BGP for details on how this is determined on large routers; on smaller routers, the routing table is typically defined by the administrator.

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I do understand that TCP is purely implemented at the endpoints (not along the network), and that TCP implements full-duplex communication. It is my sense, however, that "leaving a connection open" also means something at the IP level, rather than the TCP level, which would involve intermediate nodes along a network. However, I could be wrong. –  Dan Nissenbaum Mar 17 '13 at 5:12
    
At the IP level, there are only packets. The idea of a persistent "connection" is only introduced by TCP. –  duskwuff Mar 17 '13 at 5:19
    
Indeed, a "connection" does only correspond to TCP. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berkeley_sockets#Socket_API_functions (where close() only performs a disconnection in the case of TCP). Hence, connect() is a bit of a misnomer in the API in the case of UDP and raw IP. –  Dan Nissenbaum Mar 17 '13 at 5:22
    
Perhaps I have a false sense of the overhead in connecting/disconnecting TCP connections. At an even higher level, there is the HTTP "keep-alive" which presumably has a real effect on performance - but if the overhead for HTTP is only at the endpoints, it changes my perception of where the overhead lies. –  Dan Nissenbaum Mar 17 '13 at 5:24

First of all, let's clear up a misconception:

that intervening gateways along the complete IP network path will attempt to leave an entry in their mapping table so that the next hop can be executed immediately, without needing to do a broadcast to all connected gateways in order to determine the next hop.

Routers never "broadcast to all connected gateways" in order to determine the next hop. If a packet arrives and the router does not already know how to route it, the packet is simply dropped (possibly with an ICMP error message being sent back to the source). The job of the routing protocols that run on routers is to prepopulate the router's routing table with routes learned from peers so that they are then prepared to receive packets and route them.

Also, "the complete IP network path" is not well-defined. The network path can change at any time as links fail on the network or new links become available. It can even change from one packet to the next in the absence of routing changes due to load balancing.

Back to your question: no, whether or not a socket is closed has no impact on IP. IP is stateless in the sense that every packet is self-contained and routed independently.

Whether or not a socket is closed does make a difference to TCP, but, as you note, that concerns only the two nodes at the endpoints of the connection.

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Does that mean that the overhead involved in closing/reopening a socket connection is purely at the endpoints? –  Dan Nissenbaum Mar 17 '13 at 5:13
    
@DanNissenbaum No it doesn't. Closing and opening require packet exchanges, which have to traverse the network between the end points, so all intermediate nodes have to handle that traffic. –  EJP Mar 17 '13 at 5:29

The impact of "leaving a connection open" on speed, such that it is, is that establishing a connection in TCP requires a round-trip. But more to the point, a connection also has semantic meaning to most protocols running on TCP. Two bits of data sent on the same connection are related in a way that two bits of data sent on different connections are not.

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I am curious whether the common perception that there is "overhead" involved in "creating a new socket connection" therefore purely corresponds to either a TCP issue (due to an additional round trip handshake), and/or purely to an issue of software running on the endpoints (even if it's UDP or raw IP)? –  Dan Nissenbaum Mar 17 '13 at 5:16
    
@Dan Could easily be either. What happens on a new connection depends on the application layer. For something like SSH there might be a lot of negotiation involved. For HTTP, not so much. –  hobbs Mar 17 '13 at 5:24

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