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<%= form_for(@new_credit_entry) do |f| %>
    <%= f.date_select :created_on%>

I see that I am allowed to specify an invalid date. This results in a params hash as shown below

"credit"=>{"created_on(1i)"=>"2013",
 "created_on(2i)"=>"2",
 "created_on(3i)"=>"31"

This is of course an incorrect date. So I know my model needs to have validation for this - will probably use the validates_timeliness gem. What I need to know is how to simulate this in a spec

Here's some rails console output

irb(main):056:0> x = Credit.new(created_on: "2013-02-30")
=> #<Credit id: nil, description: nil, credit_category_id: nil, amount: nil, created_on: nil, created_at: nil, updated_at: nil>
irb(main):058:0> x.created_on_before_type_cast
=> "2013-02-30"
irb(main):060:0> x.created_on
=> nil

irb(main):057:0> y = Credit.new(created_on: "2013-03-03")
=> #<Credit id: nil, description: nil, credit_category_id: nil, amount: nil, created_on: "2013-03-03", created_at: nil, updated_at: nil>
irb(main):059:0> y.created_on_before_type_cast
=> "2013-03-03"
irb(main):061:0> y.created_on
=> Sun, 03 Mar 2013

irb(main):062:0> z = Credit.new("created_on(1i)"=>"2013",
irb(main):063:1*  "created_on(2i)"=>"2",
irb(main):064:1*  "created_on(3i)"=>"31")
=> #<Credit id: nil, description: nil, credit_category_id: nil, amount: nil, created_on: "2013-03-03", created_at: nil, updated_at: nil>
irb(main):065:0> z.created_on
=> Sun, 03 Mar 2013
irb(main):066:0> z.created_on_before_type_cast
=> Sun, 03 Mar 2013
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1 Answer 1

If you use validates_timeliness, it will reject the invalid dates you're trying above. The model will not be valid and created_on will be nil. That includes the date wrapping issue you mention.

After installing validates_timeliness, all you need in your model is:

validates_date :created_on

Here's a spec that tests a variety of scenarios:

describe Credit do
  it "rejects single digits" do
    credit = Credit.new created_on: "3"
    credit.should_not be_valid
    credit.created_on.should be_nil
  end

  it "rejects bad dates" do
    credit = Credit.new created_on: "2013-02-31"
    credit.should_not be_valid
    credit.created_on.should be_nil
  end

  it "rejects words" do
    credit = Credit.new created_on: "some nonsense"
    credit.should_not be_valid
    credit.created_on.should be_nil
  end

  it "accepts good dates" do
    date = "2013-02-28"
    credit = Credit.new created_on: date
    credit.should be_valid
    credit.created_on.should == Date.parse(date)
  end
end

You could probably validate this fairly easily even without the gem, but that looks like a handy gem to use. Don't forget to run the generator to complete installation.

If you do choose to roll your own validation, you might run into some issues.

One is that underlying databases behave somewhat differently when you try to stick a bad value into a date or datetime column; some are more flexible in the values they store and the automatic conversions they do. It's best to validate on the Rails side ahead of time.

A bigger issue is that by the time validations are run, ActiveRecord has already tried to cast the value into a type that matches the database field type. If you've got a date field in the database for created_on, ActiveRecord will convert every value assigned to created_on into a Date object. That will end up being nil for many malformed dates. In your validator, you'll want to look at created_on_before_type_cast, which will be the raw string. ActiveRecord creates a dynamic *_before_type_cast method for every DB column. You can check the format of that and reject bad values.

I mention these caveats to encourage you to stick with the gem. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Jim, With validates_date there is a catch, if I enter a blank string, It gives the error message as Invalid date. This should in fact be like "date can't be blank". Can you suggest a workaround for the same? –  Nerve Mar 17 '13 at 9:53
    
I'm not sure. Possibly validates_date :created_on, allow_blank: false, but I believe that's actually the default and that's why you're seeing that error. You could try putting validates :created_on, presence: true before validates_date :created_on; that may cause the presence validation error to show up first. –  Jim Stewart Mar 17 '13 at 10:14
    
I just tried this and it worked nice: validates :start_date, presence: true And then validates_date :start_date, allow_blank: true –  Nerve Mar 17 '13 at 10:24
    
Hi Jim, Refer to the code snippet at the end of my question. In your spec code, you are testing the x case - my question was about the 'z' case. There is a clear distinction between x and y (valid) w.r.t. the attribute values; but not between y and z. –  Gishu Mar 18 '13 at 3:54

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