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How can I refer to attributes in enums?

If I have the following enum type, how do I refer to the attribute for a particular value of this enum type?

public enum PersonGender
{
    Unknown = 0,
    Male = 1,
    Female = 2,
    Intersex = 3,
    Indeterminate = 3,

    [EnumMember("Not Stated")]
    NonStated = 9,

    [EnumMember("Inadequately Described")]
    InadequatelyDescribed = 9
}
share|improve this question
    
Maybe you should add some more info to your post, not just downvote the answers. –  user2154065 Mar 17 '13 at 7:50
    
BTW if you are using System.Runtime.Serialization.EnumMemberAttribute, then it should be applied this way [EnumMember(Value = "Not Stated")]. And you have two values equal to 9. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 17 '13 at 8:10
    
@user2154065 He didn't, the two first answerers downvoted each other –  It'sNotALie. Mar 17 '13 at 8:27
    
@ofstream No, I was the first answerer. I did not downvote anyone. –  user2154065 Mar 17 '13 at 8:58

3 Answers 3

Following code is using .Net 4.5 extension method GetCustomAttribute to get custom attribute of field

Type enumType = typeof(PersonGender);
var value = enumType.GetField(PersonGender.NonStated.ToString())
                    .GetCustomAttribute<EnumMemberAttribute>().Value; 
// returns "Not Stated"

Of course you should add null-checks for field and custom attribute

share|improve this answer
    
Error 1 'System.Reflection.FieldInfo' does not contain a definition for 'GetCustomAttribute' and no extension method 'GetCustomAttribute' accepting a first argument of type 'System.Reflection.FieldInfo' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?) –  Iswanto San Mar 17 '13 at 7:47
1  
@IswantoSan you are using old Framework. That is not reason for downvoting answers –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 17 '13 at 7:48
    
I am using .NET 4.5 –  Iswanto San Mar 17 '13 at 7:48
    
I don't think so CustomAttributeExtensions.GetCustomAttribute<T> –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 17 '13 at 7:51
1  
Exactly, you MUST be using an old Framework. This method exists. –  It'sNotALie. Mar 17 '13 at 7:56

You can use Reflection

For example:

    class EnumMemberAttribute : Attribute
    {
        private String name;

        public String Name
        {
            get { return this.name; }
            set { this.name = value; }
        }

        public EnumMemberAttribute(String name)
        {
            this.name = name;
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Type type = typeof(PersonGender);
            MemberInfo[] members = type.GetMember(PersonGender.NonStated.ToString());
            Object[] attributes = members[0].GetCustomAttributes(typeof(EnumMemberAttribute),
                false);
            Console.WriteLine(((EnumMemberAttribute)attributes[0]).Name);            
        }
    } 
share|improve this answer

At first, set InadequatelyDescribed to another value than NonStated.

Secondly the right syntax for EnumMembers is

[EnumMember(Value = "Not Stated")]

And here is the solution - working in .NET 4.0 as well as in 4.5:

PersonGender pg = PersonGender.InadequatelyDescribed;
string pgName = Enum.GetName(typeof(PersonGender), pg);

var t = typeof(PersonGender);
var info = t.GetMember(pgName);
var att = info[0].GetCustomAttributes(typeof(EnumMemberAttribute), false);

if (att.Length > 0)
{
    Console.WriteLine(((EnumMemberAttribute)att[0]).Value);
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine(pgName);
}
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