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I've been working on something that takes an html file with a bibliography and strips everything down except for the authors. I'm having a hard time getting rid of some extraneous data such as the characters in the html tags. I'd like to be able to just strip away the whole tag or even better, specific data between the tags.

Right now here is what my sub looks like:

    sub extractAuthorsIntoArray{
        @author_array = split /[<>"\/?!.=\(\)1234567890':]/, $doc;
        foreach(@author_array){
            print "$_" . "\n";
        }
    }

At this moment what it does is strip away all the tag characters but it leaves a bunch of extraneous data that I don't want such as publish date as well as publication name and such other data I don't need. Any time I try to get rid of say "< li >" it gives me my new data with those characters missing altogether. Anyways, I'll keep hammering at it.

Laters.

EDIT:

What I'd like to do is take something like this:

< li value="2">Artem Chebotko and Shiyong Lu, < b>"Nested Optional Join for Efficient Evaluation of SPARQL Nested Optional Graph Patterns"< /b>. < i>Progressive Concepts for Semantic Web Evolution: Applications and Developments< /i>, Miltiadis Lytras and Amit Sheth (Eds.), Information Science Publishing, ISBN 160566992X, 2010.< br/>< br/>< /li> < li>Artem Chebotko, Shiyong Lu, Farshad Fotouhi, and Anthony Aristar, < b>"Ontology-Based Annotation of Multimedia Language Data for the Semantic Web"< /b>. < i>Semantic Web-Based Information Systems: State-of-the-Art Applications< /i>, Amit Sheth and Miltiadis Lytras (Eds.), IGI Global, ISBN 1599044269, 2006.< br/>< br/>< /li>

And end up with this:

Artem Chebotko and Shiyong Lu

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1  
Use an HTML parser. –  squiguy Mar 17 '13 at 7:47
1  
sample input data and expected output? –  ysth Mar 17 '13 at 7:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That's a rather... unusual... way to use split. It's normally used when you have data containing several data items separated by delimiters to split the data on those delimiters and retrieve the individual items. Which isn't what you're trying to do here, so split is probably not the droid command you're looking for.

As already mentioned, a proper HTML parser would really be The Right Way to do this, but you specifically want to use a regex for educational purposes, so I'll give you one. Just be aware that parsing HTML with regexes is fraught with danger and there are almost certainly edge cases where this will fail.

So, that said:

#!/usr/bin/env perl    

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

my $text = q[< li value="2">Artem Chebotko and Shiyong Lu, < b>"Nested Optional Join for Efficient Evaluation of SPARQL Nested Optional Graph Patterns"< /b>. < i>Progressive Concepts for Semantic Web Evolution: Applications and Developments< /i>, Miltiadis Lytras and Amit Sheth (Eds.), Information Science Publishing, ISBN 160566992X, 2010.< br/>< br/>< /li> < li>Artem Chebotko, Shiyong Lu, Farshad Fotouhi, and Anthony Aristar, < b>"Ontology-Based Annotation of Multimedia Language Data for the Semantic Web"< /b>. < i>Semantic Web-Based Information Systems: State-of-the-Art Applications< /i>, Amit Sheth and Miltiadis Lytras (Eds.), IGI Global, ISBN 1599044269, 2006.< br/>< br/>< /li>];

my @list_items = $text =~ m[<\s*li(?:\s+[^>]*)?>(.*?)<\s*/li\s*>]g;

my @authors;
for (@list_items) {
  /([^<]+), </;
  push @authors, $1;
}

say for @authors;

Output:

Artem Chebotko and Shiyong Lu
Artem Chebotko, Shiyong Lu, Farshad Fotouhi, and Anthony Aristar
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My recommendation: don't use regular expressions. Instead of that, use HTML::Parser or one of the many modules that are available at CPAN.

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I don't want to use HTML:Parser. I'm trying to learn about regular expressions. –  user2177941 Mar 17 '13 at 8:38
1  
@AdamMercer: You can write your own code to parse HTML if you like, but don't do it with regular expressions. HTML isn't a regular language and regular expressions are the wrong tool. The process of parsing real-life HTML is very complex indeed, and you have chosen an incredibly tough place to start learning. –  Borodin Mar 17 '13 at 20:13
    
I think the reason I want to use pattern matching is because I know exactly where the data I want is. The data I want is between the < li> tag and almost always ends with a comma followed by < b>. I just want to be able to extract all of the authors from that chunk, then put each author in its own element in an array. –  user2177941 Mar 17 '13 at 21:08
1  
@Adam Mercer The way to learn regular expressions isn't to attempt to parse HTML with regexes. The way to learn them is to read Mastering Regular Expressions, work through the examples therein, apply the techniques that book teaches to problems that are appropriate for regexes... and of course follow up by reading all of Perl's regexp related POD. You don't learn about auto mechanics by using a chain saw on the transmission. –  DavidO Mar 18 '13 at 3:22

The problem is hard to solve in general without some certainty about the structure of the data, but based on your example, I'll make the assumption that the authors are always the first non-tag content of your data and are terminated by a comma (which is a pretty common format).

That means the problem has two parts: strip any initial HTML tags, and then drop everything after the comma.

For the first, an HTML tag is fairly easy to recognize, since it starts with < and ends with > and can't contain either of those characters. So:

$line =~ s{ \A \s* (?: < [^>]+ > \s* )+ }{}xms;

will remove all HTML tags (and whitespace) at the start of a line. (This uses the /x flag and other coding style as recommended by Perl Best Practices.) Going through this step by step, \A matches the beginning of the string, \s* matches any amount of whitespace, and the core is < [^>]+ >, which matches the HTML tag by looking for the start of the tag and then taking one or more characters until the end of the tag. This is enclosed in (?: )+ to allow any number of them. (I'm using (?:) instead of just () since it's best practice to turn off capturing if you don't care about keeping that match.)

Removing everything from the comma afterwards is much easier:

$line =~ s{ , .* }{}xms;

Now, this assumes that each bibiography entry is a single scalar in your program. That glosses over a rather large problem; if instead you have a variable that contains the whole page, you may need to parse that. If each entry is an <li> tag, what you want to do is extract the contents of each <li> tag and then process it as above.

To do that, match in a list context with the /g option doing something like this:

my @entries = ($doc =~ m{ <li (?: \s [^>] )? > (.*?) </li> }xmsg);

Some more subtleties here. The (?: )? bit after <li optionally matches whitespace followed by some number of characters other than > to allow for any attributes to that tag. The (.*?) part does the actual work of extracting the content of the tag. Note the ? after the *. This makes the match non-greedy, which means that rather than matching everything up to the last </li> tag in the document, it matches everything up to the first </li> tag. Finally, the /g modifier says to repeat this match as many times as possible, and return the contents of the capturing () as a list.

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Okay so what if its all in one single string and what I want to do is parse that string and end up with each author chunk in a single array? Would that still be possible with regexs? –  user2177941 Mar 17 '13 at 9:10
    
Your "remove everything from the comma afterwards" step will break on entries with more than two authors (e.g., "Artem Chebotko, Shiyong Lu, Farshad Fotouhi, and Anthony Aristar") because of the embedded commas. You need to still have the tags around at that point so you can identify which is the last comma before the first tag. –  Dave Sherohman Mar 17 '13 at 9:10
    
@AdamMercer yes, that's the last part of the response. That parses out the contents of every <li></li> pair in the document. –  rra Mar 17 '13 at 9:13
    
@DaveSherohman Oh, good point! I missed that the authors could contain commas. In that case, the second regex is probably better written as , \s* <.*, which only removes everything after the first comma followed by a tag. –  rra Mar 17 '13 at 9:14
#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;
read DATA, my $string, -s DATA;
my @matches = ( $string =~ /<\s+li\s*(?:.*?)>(.+?),\s+<\s+b>/g );
print "$_\n\n" foreach (@matches);

__DATA__
< li value="2">Artem Chebotko and Shiyong Lu, < b>"Nested Optional Join for Efficient Evaluation of SPARQL Nested Optional Graph Patterns"< /b>. < i>Progressive Concepts for Semantic Web Evolution: Applications and Developments< /i>, Miltiadis Lytras and Amit Sheth (Eds.), Information Science Publishing, ISBN 160566992X, 2010.< br/>< br/>< /li> < li>Artem Chebotko, Shiyong Lu, Farshad Fotouhi, and Anthony Aristar, < b>"Ontology-Based Annotation of Multimedia Language Data for the Semantic Web"< /b>. < i>Semantic Web-Based Information Systems: State-of-the-Art Applications< /i>, Amit Sheth and Miltiadis Lytras (Eds.), IGI Global, ISBN 1599044269, 2006.< br/>< br/>< /li>

If you're willing to solve this specific problem, then what your regex should be looking for is either:

a) < li value="2">AUTHORS, < b>
b) < li>AUTHORS, < b>

For a) one possible regex is:

< \s+ li \s+ value="2"> (.+), \s+ <\s+b>

For b) one possible regex is:

< \s+ li> (.+), \s+ <\s+b>

Combining these two regexs yeilds:

<\s+li\s*(?:.*?)>(.+?),\s+<\s+b>

Not elegant & etc. but maybe it'll help you.

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