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I'm self-learning Java and I want to understand multithreading. I created MyThread class with a job to perform a loop until a condition is true and then print information about it. It contains static field left which is incremented in a constructor and decremented when a job is done. Class Flag is 'telling' threads when to start. Unfortunately, when all threads are done left does not equal zero. I made some of methods synchronized and it got better but it still is not perfect. What am I doing wrong?

import java.util.Random;

class Flag
{
    private boolean ok = false;
    synchronized boolean ok()
    {
        return ok;
    }
    synchronized void setOk(boolean ok)
    {
        this.ok = ok;
    }
}

class MyThread extends Thread
{
    static int left = 0;

    synchronized void add()
    {
        left++;
    }

    synchronized int remove()
    {
        return --left;
    }

    String name;
    Flag flag;
    Random rnd = new Random();
    public MyThread(String name, Flag flag)
    {
        this.name = name;
        this.flag = flag;
        add();
    }

    public void run()
    {
        while(!flag.ok());

        double rnd;
        long count = 0;
        do{
            count++;
            rnd = Math.random();
        } while(rnd > 0.00001);
        print(count);
    }

    synchronized void print(long count)
    {
        System.out.printf("%s %10d left: %3d%n", name, count, remove());
    }
}

public class Test
{
    public static void main(String... args) throws Exception
    {
        Flag flag = new Flag();
        for(int i=0; i<2000; i++){
            new MyThread(String.format("%04d",i),flag).start();
        }

        flag.setOk(true);
    }
}
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What is the expected output ? –  Arpit Mar 17 '13 at 8:08
    
In the last line I want to see something lke 1540 243385 left: 0. It is (from left): thread name, counter (how many iterations were in the loop) and 0 (the number of threads left). Instead, I'm getting something like 1540 243385 left: 5. –  Pawel P. Mar 17 '13 at 8:11
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

++left and --left are not atomic operations. When several threads are trying to execute, it may be the case that two try to decrement left at the same time. This behavior is due to your code synchronizing on the instance level (print is an instance method), while left is an static (class) variable.

Note also that the values printed in print() are unordered (because print is not static-synchronized, then the "last" value that is printed might not be that of the last thread that invoked print).

First change: check that left is indeed zero after all threads are executed.

public static void main(String... args) throws Exception
    {
        java.util.List<Thread> threads = new java.util.LinkedList<Thread>();
        Flag flag = new Flag();

        for(int i=0; i<20; i++){
            Thread thread=new MyThread(String.format("%04d",i),flag);
            threads.add(thread);
            thread.start();
        }

        flag.setOk(true);            
        for (Thread thread:threads) thread.join();
        System.out.println(MyThread.left);
    }

Output:

0003       9527 left:  19
0000      56748 left:  18
0006      11428 left:  17
0016     181845 left:   2
0010      95287 left:   3
0017     137911 left:   4
0018     432172 left:   5
0019     280280 left:   6
0013     421170 left:   7
0012     135830 left:   8
0015     104375 left:   9
0014     207409 left:  10
0001      16157 left:  11
0004     160136 left:  12
0008      31673 left:  13
0002      14589 left:  14
0005      23692 left:  15
0009      83419 left:  16
0011     231135 left:   0
0007     202603 left:   1
0

Second change: synchronize on the class (add, remove and print are converted into static methods; we have also to replace the call to print in run because name is no longer visible from the static method print).

  synchronized static void add()
    {
        left++;
    }

  synchronized static int remove()
    {
        return --left;
    }

  synchronized static void print(long count, String name)
    {
        System.out.printf("%s %10d left: %3d%n", name, count, remove());
    }

  public void run()
    {
        ...
        print(count,name);
    }  

Output:

0012      10207 left:  19
0006     121343 left:  18
0000      16236 left:  17
0008      81429 left:  16
0010      20250 left:  15
0002      14687 left:  14
0015      11051 left:  13
0017      23602 left:  12
0019      19651 left:  11
0005     180155 left:  10
0014     126578 left:   9
0003      41790 left:   8
0016      98362 left:   7
0001      96047 left:   6
0004     334071 left:   5
0009      46827 left:   4
0018     102826 left:   3
0013      71625 left:   2
0007     267208 left:   1
0011     188743 left:   0
0
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Thanks, All works :). –  Pawel P. Mar 17 '13 at 8:19
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Unexpected result due to Object synchronization on static variable.

I have tested your code with little change. I used Synchronized block with MyThread.class as because I need synchronization of a static variable inside MyThread.

void add() {
    synchronized (MyThread.class) {
        left++;
    }
}

int remove() {
    synchronized (MyThread.class) {
        return --left;
    }
}

Every time it prints expected result. You can also use AtomicInteger variable. It is used in applications such as atomically incremented counters.

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Do not use plain variables when exchanging information between threads. Treat threads as processes with their own memory. To decide how to exchange information, ask following questions:

  1. Does BlockingQueue fits my needs? BlockingQueue is most common media to exchange information between threads.

  2. If it does, do I really need to send chunks of data, or I need only count the number of signals? There are several types of shared counters: Semaphore, Atomic numbers, CountdownLatch, and others. In your case, AtomicInteger looks enough.

  3. If it does not, can other ready types of synchronized collections work?

  4. If there is no ready synchronized data exchange class that fits your needs, create your own.

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