Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

It there a simple way to shuffle a list in AppleScript?

I have done several searches and drawn a blank.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A shorter version of the Fisher-Yates algorithm:

on shuffle(l)
    set i to count of l
    repeat while i ≥ 2
        set j to random number from 1 to i
        tell l to set {item i, item j} to {item j, item i}
        set i to i - 1
    end repeat
    l
end shuffle

set l to {}
repeat 1000 times
    set end of l to random number from 1 to 1000
end repeat
shuffle(l)

There are i * ... * 2 = i! possible sequences of random numbers. All of them correspond to exactly one permutation out of the i! permutations of the list.

A faster version that uses a script object:

on shuffle(input)
    script s
        property l : input
    end script
    set i to count of l of s
    repeat while i ≥ 2
        set j to random number from 1 to i
        set {item i of l of s, item j of l of s} to {item j of l of s, item i of l of s}
        set i to i - 1
    end repeat
    l of s
end shuffle

The scripts took about:

  • 0.15 and 0.06 seconds for 1000 elements
  • 12 and 0.5 seconds for 10000 elements
  • 976 seconds and 4 seconds for 100000 elements

So the first script had exponential time complexity. The scripts posted by regulus were slightly slower.

When I saved the first script as scpt and added 10000 elements to the list, I ran into a limit for the number of items that can be saved in a compiled script.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain the second last row, l of s? –  user23122 Nov 29 '14 at 15:14
    
Actually, can you elaborate how set {item i of l of s, item j of l of s} to {item j of l of s, item i of l of s} works? –  user23122 Nov 29 '14 at 15:16

I think I've cracked it. Wrapped up in a function for ease of use.

set myList to {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}

set answer to listShuffle(myList)


on listShuffle(theList)

set listLength to count of theList

repeat while listLength > 1



    set r to random number from 1 to listLength

    set item1 to item listLength of theList
    set item2 to item r of theList

    set item listLength of theList to item2
    set item r of theList to item1

    set listLength to listLength - 1

end repeat

return theList

end listShuffle
share|improve this answer
    
This is actually the Fisher-Yates algorithm. Sattolo's algorithm would have random number from 1 to listLength - 1, and it only produces permutations that are cycles (it will only change {1, 2, 3} to {2, 3, 1} or {3, 1, 2}). –  ؘؘؘؘ Mar 24 '13 at 17:56

Here's an alternative. Rather than "shuffling" the list, we just randomly grab items from the list and insert them into a new list...

set myList to {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}
set randomizedList to randomizeList(myList)

on randomizeList(theList)
    set listCount to count of theList

    set newList to {}
    repeat listCount times
        set subListCount to count of theList
        set r to random number from 1 to subListCount
        set end of newList to item r of theList

        -- remove the random item from theList
        if subListCount is 1 then
            exit repeat
        else if r = 1 then --> first item
            set theList to items 2 thru end of theList
        else if r = subListCount then --> last item
            set theList to items 1 thru -2 of theList
        else
            set theList to items 1 thru (r - 1) of theList & items (r + 1) thru -1 of theList
        end if
    end repeat

    return newList
end randomizeList

EDIT: if you want to speed up actions on a large list you can use a script object. You will often see a large speed gain when the list is large. So you could write you code this way using a script object...

set myList to {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}
set answer to listShuffle(myList)

on listShuffle(theList)
    script s
        property l : missing value
    end script
    set s's l to theList

    set listLength to count of s's l

    repeat while listLength > 1
        set r to random number from 1 to listLength

        set item1 to item listLength of s's l
        set item2 to item r of s's l

        set item listLength of s's l to item2
        set item r of s's l to item1

        set listLength to listLength - 1
    end repeat

    return s's l
end listShuffle
share|improve this answer
    
I'm new to applescript, is the above method more efficient than my own solution? –  regnix Mar 17 '13 at 18:18
1  
I don't know about more efficient, but I would bet that all of your numbers don't move. For example, you get 10 random numbers from 1 to 10. Because they're random you probably don't get every number (some numbers will repeat), thus in your code not every item will be called. In my code, I remove the item from the list and then get another random item until I get all of them. Thus my code acts on every list item. So you decide which method works best for your situation. I just wanted to show you an alternative. They both mix them up to some degree. –  regulus6633 Mar 17 '13 at 22:11
    
Thanks for the reply. I was just wondering, as in every language I always end end shuffling arrays/Lists at some point and was looking for a good snippet to bookmark for applescript. My code is a straight copy of Sattolo's algorithm from Wikipedia and works for me. I was concerned about the efficiency because I'm shuffling Lists of about 3,000 items at the moment and expect it to be a lot more in the final version of my current project. ( And you ALWAYS have to shuffle a couple of times as you know what 'Random' numbers are like on computers ;) ) –  regnix Mar 18 '13 at 1:28
    
If your list is large then you can do something to speed up your code. See the "EDIT" section of my post. –  regulus6633 Mar 18 '13 at 6:53

If the items in your new list don't have to be unique, then you could use the very efficient

set selectedItemVar to some item of list someItemListVar
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.