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I'm wondering what's the difference of the bitmask below, and it what scenario you can use then.

int a  = 1;
int b  = 2;
int c  = 4;
int d  = 8;


int letters = a | b | d; 

int aviableLettersMask = //input some letter;  


if (letters & aviableLettersMask)
{

}

if ((letters & ~aviableLettersMask) == 0)
{

}

Thanks

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Anoop Vaidya, abligh, Bill Woodger, Chris, Wouter van Nifterick Mar 3 at 1:54

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
why dont you check here en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitwise_operations_in_C –  Anoop Vaidya Mar 17 '13 at 9:15
    
This question makes no sense to me –  Aniket Mar 17 '13 at 9:16
    
nothing to do with ios either. And doing random operations on numbers?? –  Anoop Vaidya Mar 17 '13 at 9:17
    
this question is C –  Edouard Thiel Mar 17 '13 at 9:19
    
@AnoopVaidya ... because wikipedia makes a point to be less-than-encyclopedic, and at times, down-right incorrect? Perhaps you meant to link to n1570.pdf. –  undefined behaviour Mar 17 '13 at 9:21

2 Answers 2

The difference is in the following:

The first once checks if there any letter in a aviableLettersMask presents in letters

The second one - if there is no other letters rather existing in aviableLettersMask.

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The first expression will be true iff AviableLettersMask contains at least one letter or Letters:

a|b|d & a|c = a  // ok
a|b|d & c = 0    // false
a|b|d & 0 = 0    // false

The second expression will equal 0 iff AviableLettersMask contains Letters:

a|b|d & ~(a|b)     = a|b|d & c|d = d  // false
a|b|d & ~(a|b|d)   = a|b|d & c   = 0  // ok
a|b|d & ~(a|b|c|d) = a|b|d & 0   = 0  // ok
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