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I am trying to implement a mechanism where lock ordering is automatically checked and an exception is thrown when locks are acquired out of order at runtime to avoid deadlocks. A reference implementation is below. Please let me know if you see any issues with this implementation. Many thanks.

public class someResource
{
    private OrderedLock lock1 = new OrderedLock(1);
    private OrderedLock lock2 = new OrderedLock(2);

    public void lockInOrder()
    {
        lock1.AcquireWriteLock();
        lock2.AcquireWriteLock();
        // do something
        lock1.ReleaseWriteLock();
        lock2.ReleaseWriteLock();
    }

    public void lockOutOfOrder()
    {
        lock2.AcquireReadLock();
        lock1.AcquireReadLock(); // throws exception
        // read something
        lock2.ReleaseReadLock();
        lock1.ReleaseReadLock();
    }
}

public class OrderedLock : IDisposable
{
    private static readonly ConcurrentDictionary<int, object> createdLocks = new ConcurrentDictionary<int, object>();
    [ThreadStatic]
    private static ISet<int> acquiredLocks;

    private readonly ThreadLocal<int> refCount = new ThreadLocal<int>(false);
    private readonly ReaderWriterLockSlim locker = new ReaderWriterLockSlim(LockRecursionPolicy.SupportsRecursion);
    private readonly int id;

    /// <exception cref="InvalidOperationException">Duplicate identifier detected</exception>
    public OrderedLock(int id)
    {
        if (!createdLocks.TryAdd(id, null))
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Duplicate identifier detected");
        }

        this.id = id;
        this.refCount.Value = 0;
    }

    public void AcquireReadLock()
    {
        this.CheckLockOrder();
        this.locker.EnterReadLock();
    }

    public void AcquireWriteLock()
    {
        this.CheckLockOrder();
        this.locker.EnterWriteLock();
    }

    public void ReleaseReadLock()
    {
        this.refCount.Value--;
        this.locker.ExitReadLock();
        if (this.refCount.Value == 0)
        {
            acquiredLocks.Remove(this.id);
        }
    }

    public void ReleaseWriteLock()
    {
        this.refCount.Value--;
        this.locker.ExitWriteLock();
        if (this.refCount.Value == 0)
        {
            acquiredLocks.Remove(this.id);
        }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        while (this.locker.IsWriteLockHeld)
        {
            this.ReleaseWriteLock();
        }

        while (this.locker.IsReadLockHeld)
        {
            ReleaseReadLock();
        }

        this.locker.Dispose();
        this.refCount.Dispose();
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    /// <exception cref="InvalidOperationException">Invalid order of locking detected</exception>
    private void CheckLockOrder()
    {
        if (acquiredLocks == null)
        {
            acquiredLocks = new HashSet<int>();
        }

        if (!acquiredLocks.Contains(this.id))
        {
            if (acquiredLocks.Any() && acquiredLocks.Max() > this.id)
            {
                throw new InvalidOperationException("Invalid order of locking detected");
            }

            acquiredLocks.Add(this.id);
        }

        this.refCount.Value++;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Access to your mAcquiredLocks isn't synchronized. If two threads are adding/removing locks at the same time, this is going to fail. – Jim Mischel Mar 17 '13 at 12:58
    
Thanks Jim. But it is static per thread which should create a different instance per thread. – pavy bez Mar 17 '13 at 13:16
    
How'd I miss that? You'll probably get better responses over at codereview. – Jim Mischel Mar 17 '13 at 14:45
1  
This code fails the Darwin test: if it was that useful then why isn't it already part of the .NET Framework? Because it only catches trivial cases of deadlock, ones that are already very simple to debug. Adding shared state for trivial reasons is never a good idea. – Hans Passant Mar 17 '13 at 16:19
    
@Hans. I beg to differ. Circular waiting is a common reason for deadlock. Deadlocks cannot be debugged easily because one cannot reproduce them while testing often and they suddenly occur in production environments. – pavy bez Mar 18 '13 at 23:24

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