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I've a make file for a scripted system, with a lot of tests which should pass. Each test is a separate call to the scripting application:

#----------------------------------------------------------------------------
# run test scripts in the module::test
#----------------------------------------------------------------------------
scripted_tests: bin/kin modules/test/actor_equality.kin modules/test/actor_fibre.kin ...
    bin/kin modules/test/actor_equality.kin
    bin/kin modules/test/actor_fibre.kin
    ...

Which is fine. I also have some similar tests which should return failure. I know that - will ignore the return status, but there must be something simple to invert the return status so I can run

#----------------------------------------------------------------------------
# run test scripts in the module::test::errors
#----------------------------------------------------------------------------
inverse_tests: bin/kin modules/test/error/bad_function.kin ...
    not bin/kin modules/test/error/bad_function.kin
    ...
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use the ! command.

echo This returns success
! echo This returns failure
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Specifically, its "! bin/kin" rather than "!bin/kin", which I tried and got an error –  Pete Kirkham Oct 9 '09 at 20:53
    
Very useful when using grep to test for the presence of an error message in build log output. ! grep output.log -i "error msg" –  shuckc Oct 11 '13 at 16:52

Suppose you want to make sure that the exit status of "bin/kin test5.kin" is 5. Then just write this:

run-test5:
  bin/kin test5.bin; test $$? = 5

For more elaborated tests see 'help test' and 'man test'.

Note: I tend to avoid exclamation marks because it is typically impossible to copy/paste them into an interactive shell (since it searches the history).

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