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i am trying to follow these slides on bayesian networks. Can anybody explain me what it means that a node in a bayesian network is "instantiated"?

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2 Answers 2

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It means the node is created. Spawned. Brought to existence. If B isn't represented by an instance (roughly: does not exist), then the path is different than if B exists (is instantiated).

You can get evidence either by instantiating a node (in which case its truth value is known) or by arriving to this node from some other node. So either the node is instantiated and you get evidence from its truth value, or it is not and you get evidence from the flow.

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so then what is the difference between "a node is instantiated" and "a node gives evidence". does it mean that the latter one was instantiated before? –  user1291235 Mar 17 '13 at 11:36
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@user1291235 You can get evidence either by instantiating a node (in which case its truth value is known) or by arriving to this node from some other node. So either the node is instantiated and you get evidence from its truth value, or it is not and you get evidence by the flow. So the difference is in the way you get the evidence. –  Jean Mar 17 '13 at 12:03

Instantiating a node in Bayesian networks is different from object oriented programming. A node is instantiated when it's value is known through observing what it represents. If it is not instantiated then it's value can be updated through Bayesian inference.

In the example A -> B -> C. Assuming nodes are boolean (either true or false) then if you instantiate C (e.g. C = true) then the values of B and A will update using Bayesian inference. However, if B is also instantiated then it d-separates A and C, so instantiating C will not update A. The rules of d-separation depend on the type of node configuration, so that instantiating a node may either d-separate or d-connect nodes.

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