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I am trying to use boost regex in one of my projects. Actually I'm porting one of my softwares to C++ and it is very dependant on regular expressions.

I see something that it's against my previous experiences with other Regex libraries. I hope someone can help me to understand or let me know if there are extra flags I can use in boost to achieve my requirement.

Here is the subject string:

This is an example to test regex `54 6767 98`  thats it

When I use this regex: \\\d*, I expect to get 54 as result (which happens when I use .Net regex or TperlRegex in delphi) But when I use boost, function returns TRUE but cmatch is empty!

Is it normal? I know I can use \d+ . but that's not the point as I need it to work because it will be cause of many other problems in more complex regular expressions that I'm using in my software.

Here is the code by the way :

cmatch what;
boost::regex re("\\d*", regex::perl | regex::icase);
std::string ssub = "something 54 67 979 some text";
if ( boost::regex_search(ssub.c_str(), what , re )
  return what[0];

I think it should return 54 in this case, but it doesn't. It's working in /Net Regex and TperlRegex as I expected.

Regards

share|improve this question
    
'*' matches 0 or more. You want '?' to match 1 or more. –  stark Mar 17 '13 at 11:34
    
@stark: WRONG. ? matches 0 or 1. + matches 1 or more. But it doesn't really matter here, since the engine should be greedy and eat up the longest string that can be matched by \d*. –  nhahtdh Mar 17 '13 at 11:39
    
Sorry, meant +. ANyway, \d* matches at the beginning of the string. –  stark Mar 17 '13 at 11:49
    
@stark: That's correct. You should add it as an answer. –  nhahtdh Mar 17 '13 at 11:56
    
@stack I know \d* matches at the beginning of the string , but it does work in .Net Regex as well. It was just a simple example to show what is my issue. i have many complex regex that will not work because of this issue and i am not going to change all of them as they are tested and working in current software. Thanks for your answer, i appreciate it. –  QProgrammer Mar 17 '13 at 18:18

1 Answer 1

'*' matches 0 or more. You want '+' to match 1 or more.

The problem is that \d* will match at any place in a string. To guarantee that it starts at a digit, use +.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1. liveworkspace.org/code/3Kk24s$0. You can also use the match_not_null flag in your invocation of regex_search. liveworkspace.org/code/3Kk24s$1. –  user1252091 Mar 17 '13 at 12:11
    
Thanks stark , but it was just a simple example to show what is my issue. i have many complex regex that will not work because of this issue. using + in this example doesn't solve my problem. –  QProgrammer Mar 17 '13 at 18:21
    
llonesmiz , thanks a lot! That was the trick! it works as i expected when i use match_not_null flag. –  QProgrammer Mar 17 '13 at 18:23

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