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I've just started with pointers in c. This program gives the desired output but I am getting the below warnings when I compile it, What am I doing wrong?

pointer.c:3: warning: initialization makes pointer from integer without a cast 

pointer.c:5: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘printf’

pointer.c:8: warning: assignment from incompatible pointer type

pointer.c:12: warning: assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast

And my code is:

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
 {
  int *x=2, *ampx, *starampx, starx;

  printf("x=");
  printf("%d\n",x);

  ampx=&x;
  printf("&x=");
  printf("%d\n",&x);

  starampx=*ampx;
  printf("*&x=");
  printf("%d\n",starampx);

  return 0;
  }

I love SO. I will be posting more questions as I've just started. Thank you in advance. :)

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3  
You should ask 1 question at a time. You are asking multiple questions at once which is why I think this question should be closed. I don't agree with H2C03 about trivial questions, but I believe all of these have been covered already on SO if they were one question each. –  Hogan Mar 17 '13 at 11:54
    
Got it @Hogan, thankx :) –  Shy Student Mar 17 '13 at 12:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here is why:

  1. initialization makes pointer from integer without a cast - int *x = 2, ... should be int x = 2, ...
  2. incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘printf’ - You need to add an #include <stdio.h> line at the top
  3. assignment from incompatible pointer type - This will be fixed by the #1 change
  4. assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast - *starampx should be starampx in the declaration.

In addition, printing pointers should be done with %p specifier, not %d:

printf("%p\n",&x);

Here is your fixed program on ideone: link.

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thank u @dasblinkenlink. that was really helpful :) –  Shy Student Mar 17 '13 at 11:59
 int *x=2

is actually causing your program to have undefined behavior. It tells the compiler to point at an address 2, which may or may not be valid and derferencing the pointer will causes an undefined behavior.
Whenever you are using pointers, You need to make the pointer point to a valid memory big enough to store a int before you can store anything. So you either need:

int i = 2;
int *x = &i;

or you simply use:

int x = 2;

Considering, how you use x later in the program the latter is what you need.

You need to include stdio.h which tells the compiler that printf is an standard c library function.

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1  
It is defined in C -- x will point to location 2. I will probably give an access violation if you try and use it, but it is defined. –  Hogan Mar 17 '13 at 11:51
    
@Hogan: Edited for clarity. –  Alok Save Mar 17 '13 at 11:53
    
Better, it will cause undefined behavior. I like it. –  Hogan Mar 17 '13 at 11:56
    
thank u @Alok Save. that was really helpful :) –  Shy Student Mar 17 '13 at 11:59

In your code, in this statement, you have a problem.

int *x=2, *ampx, *starampx, starx;
     ^           ^
     |           |

*x is a pointer. To store the value of 2, you would need to allocate space for the same. Instead of the current implementation, please try with

int x=2, *ampx, starampx, starx;
share|improve this answer
    
thank u @Ganesh. that was really helpful :) –  Shy Student Mar 17 '13 at 12:00

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