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For every given car in a traffic simulation, the Nagel-Schreckenberg model specifies that the following four steps must be applied to all cars in the simulation, in parallel in the stated order below :

  1. Acceleration: All cars not at the maximum velocity have their velocity increased by one unit. For example, if the velocity is 4 it is increased to 5.
  2. Slowing down: All cars are checked to see if the distance between it and the car in front (in units of cells) is smaller than its current velocity (which has units of cells per time step). If the distance is smaller than the velocity, the velocity is reduced to the number of empty cells in front of the car – to avoid a collision. For example, if the velocity of a car is now 5, but there are only 3 free cells in front of it, with the fourth cell occupied by another car, the car velocity is reduced to 3.
  3. Randomization: The speed of all cars that have a velocity of at least 1, is now reduced by one unit with a probability of p. For example, if p = 0.5, then if the velocity is 4, it is reduced to 3 50% of the time.
  4. Car motion: Finally, all cars are moved forward the number of cells equal to their velocity. For example, if the velocity is 3, the car is moved forward 3 cells.

(Nagel Schreckenberg Model)

I understand that logic behind this, and I understand why it must be executed in parallel for it to work properly. However, I'm not sure how to implement this in Java. Seeing as it must be executed in parallel it must imply that one separate thread is allocated to running through all these steps for every car at roughly the same time?

Wouldn't that be a lot of threads for say up to 30 cars that I can have at a time running in the simulation? The only way that I can think of would be to have a pool of threads and reuse those to avoid creating the threads everytime. I'm still not confident that it's an optimal solution though.

Any thoughts?

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2  
parallel != concurrent – Thomas Jungblut Mar 17 '13 at 12:03
    
That only makes it even more confusing for me :p could you elaborate please? – DSF Mar 17 '13 at 12:06
    
It means feel free to use a single thread to implement. – Marko Topolnik Mar 17 '13 at 12:07
2  
Not only that, the idea is that you need to maintain the state of your model before your computation, then compute for all cars and afterwards update the whole model (if you would update while computing, you have inconsistent behaviour in your model). That's what is usually meant by parallel updating. Concurrent means that you can use indeed 1-n threads to do the same (because your computation can be done concurrent for every car as the model shouldn't change). – Thomas Jungblut Mar 17 '13 at 12:11
    
Ah I see. Makes sense, did not think of it in that way. Just thought of concurrency == parallelism. Thank you :) Please post as answer if you want. – DSF Mar 17 '13 at 12:19
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The idea behind the algorithm is that you need to maintain the state of your model before your computation, then compute for all cars and afterwards update the whole model.

That's what is usually meant by parallel updating.

If you would update while computing, you have inconsistent behaviour in your model as it changes while you calculate it for the next timestep.

Concurrent means that you can use indeed 1-n threads to do the same, because your computation can be done concurrent for every car as the model shouldn't change.

Personally, I would not do it concurrent as long as the computation of your model becomes the bottleneck, very likely when you have a lot of cars. In that case, I would allocate a ThreadPool with equal the numbers of threads as CPU cores and chunk the car list into an equal amount of cars.

Then let each thread calculate its new state of the model, afterwards combine the parts again.

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I think the way this is presented in the wikipedia article is somewhat misleading.

If you examine the 4 steps, you'll see that the first 3 can be logically collapsed into 1 (adjust a vehicles velocity based on current velocity, no. of free cells ahead, and a random factor). For each vehicle, only one of those is external state - the no. of free cells - and that is only updated in step 4. Step 4 is not influenced by external state - the cars are blindly moved based on their current velocity. This is what is meant by "parallelism" in the article - the 2 logical actions are not performed in sequence per vehicle, but instead for the entire model.

The threading question is therefore moot, as all that needs to happen is that all cars have their velocities modified, and then all cars are moved. There is no inherent need for multi-threading in either of those steps, other than for efficiency.

The simplest implementation would therefore be:

(given a collection of cars)

  • iterate over all cars, applying the velocity modification rules
  • iterate over all cars, applying the position change
  • repeat until done
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