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I'm trying to do the following:

try {
    // just an example
    $time      = 'wrong datatype';
    $timestamp = date("Y-m-d H:i:s", $time);
} catch (Exception $e) {
    return false;
}
// database activity here

In short: I initialize some variables to be put in the database. If the initialization fails for whatever reason - e.g. because $time is not the expected format - I want the method to return false and not input wrong data into the database.

However, errors like this are not caught by the 'catch'-statement, but by the global error handler. And then the script continues.

Is there a way around this? I just thought it would be cleaner to do it like this instead of manually typechecking every variable, which seems ineffective considering that in 99% of all cases nothing bad happens.

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That's because exceptions are not universally implemented in PHP. They are a PHP5 addition, and very few of the built-in functions will throw them. Instead, you will need to verify the return values of most functions. –  Michael Berkowski Mar 17 '13 at 14:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Solution #1

Use ErrorException to turn errors into exceptions to handle:

function exception_error_handler($errno, $errstr, $errfile, $errline ) {
    throw new ErrorException($errstr, $errno, 0, $errfile, $errline);
}
set_error_handler("exception_error_handler");

Solution #2

try {
    // just an example
    $time      = 'wrong datatype';
    if (false === $timestamp = date("Y-m-d H:i:s", $time)) {
        throw new Exception('date error');
    }
} catch (Exception $e) {
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
A couple notes: 1) If it's not desired to universally raise exceptions in place of errors throughout the application, this can be enabled where desired and regular error handling can be restored with restore_error_handler(). 2) I expect #2 to still throw a warning. Same concept applies: the error reporting level could be changed with error_reporting() and changed back afterward. –  Wiseguy Mar 17 '13 at 14:23
    
The warning MUST BE threw anyway. They are information that you must save it somewhere. If you do not want to see it, just turn off error_display –  Laxus Mar 17 '13 at 14:27
    
Went with solution #1. –  Marcos Mar 17 '13 at 16:56

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