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I have a webservice that returns the same generic container for every request with some basic information. For example, requesting a list of users will give me the following response:

{
   "error":false,
   "message":"Message goes here",
   "items":[
      {
         "id":1,
         "name":"Test User 1"
      },
      {
         "id":2,
         "name":"Test User 2"
      }
   ]
}

When requesting a different resource, only the list of items will differ:

{
   "error":false,
   "message":"Message goes here",
   "items":[
      {
         "id":3,
         "artist":"Artist 1",
         "year":2001
      },
      {
         "id":4,
         "artist":"Artist 2",
         "year":1980
      }
   ]
}

In my client I want to map the response on java objects using GSON:

public class ArtistRestResponse {
    private boolean error;
    private String message = "";
    private Artist[] items;     
}

However, to refactor the common fields and keep me from creating classes for each resource, it would be a logical step to create a generically typed RestResponse<T> class:

public class RestResponse<T> {
   private boolean error;
   private String message = "";
   private T[] items;           
}

The problem is that it is impossible to use RestResponse<Artist> = new Gson().fromJson(json, RestResponse<Artist>.class);. Is there any way use such a construction, or is there a better way to handle the server response?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should use TypeToken here.

final TypeToken<RestResponse<Artist>> token = new TypeToken<RestResponse<Artist>>() {};
final Type type = token.getType();
final Gson gson = new Gson();

final RestResponse<Artist> response = gson.fromJson(json, type);
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