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Givin this html:

<body>
  <div id="a"></div>
  <div id="b"></div>
</body>

I want to #b fills all the remaining vertical space of its container block, i began with this:

body {
  height: 500px;
  width: 500px;
  overflow: hidden;
}

#a {
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
}

#b {
  height: 100%;
  width: 100%;
}

So #b is 100% height, what means that is taking the height of its parent container block, that its 500px, the problem is that the overflow: hidden; seems to not work, #b is not clipped. In the other hand, if i wrap #a and #b with another div with the same properties as body above i have the desired result:

#wrap {
  height: 500px;
  width: 500px;
  overflow: hidden;
}

#a {
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
}

#b {
  height: 100%;
  width: 100%;
}

with this html of course:

<body>
<div id="wrap">
<div id="a"></div>
<div id="b"></div>
</div>
</body>

My question is why div and body seems to have different behaviors with the same properties? and is there any way to get the same effect without the wrapper?

To illustrate the question I have created two jsFiddles:

jsFiddle with body tag as wrapper: http://jsfiddle.net/3AMtG/

jsFiddle with div tag as wrapper: http://jsfiddle.net/2QWn3/

Two jsFiddles with the same properties yield different results. Why is that?

share|improve this question
    
i can´t see any difference between your two exaples, and thats maybe the point, i guess a body tag has a more basical value than a div tag and every browser has its own way to render etc @Firefox 19.0.2 –  john Smith Mar 17 '13 at 15:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The overflow property has certain special behaviors specific to HTML's html and body elements, which are described in the CSS2.1 spec. These special cases are in place to accommodate changing overflow settings on the entire page in normal circumstances (i.e. which normally would be applicable to either one of those elements).

In this case, when you apply overflow: hidden to body, it actually affects the viewport instead of body (you can see this by resizing the preview pane to make it shorter — no scrollbars will appear on the preview pane itself). This causes #b to overflow the body normally even though you give it a fixed height that's less than the sum of #a and #b.

If you set overflow to something other than visible on html, though, this causes the viewport to use the value given to html instead of body, thereby leaving the declaration on body unaffected and allowing it to behave the same as the wrapper:

html {
  overflow: auto;
}

body {
  height: 500px;
  width: 500px;
  overflow: hidden;
}

jsFiddle preview

share|improve this answer
    
this is supposed to work then jsfiddle.net/btevfik/3AMtG/4 but its not working. am i missing something? –  btevfik Mar 17 '13 at 15:10
    
@btevfik: The overflow: hidden line is missing from body. You need to keep that declaration while adding a new one to html so the viewport will use the one from html instead while allowing the body one to take effect. –  BoltClock Mar 17 '13 at 15:11
    
its confusing.... –  btevfik Mar 17 '13 at 15:14
    
yeah didnt see it before you editted it. –  btevfik Mar 17 '13 at 15:16

body and div have totally different of them. In my daily working, I like constructing my code like this.

<div class='xxx-ctn'>
  <div class='xxx-inner'>
    <div class='data-wrapper'>
      [p|ul|ol|h1-h6|article|section].....
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

Okey, I missing your founding, but I think this is a good coding habbit.

share|improve this answer

Body element is considered as main parent element inside which other elements that are displayed within the browser window resides therefore, width and height property is not applicable onto it. According to the best practices it is better to create a div container like #wrapper that you did in your second example.

share|improve this answer
    
Of course they are applicable. –  BoltClock Mar 17 '13 at 15:49

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