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Please have a look at the following code

public class Test {

    public Test()
    {
        Timer timer = new Timer();
        timer.schedule(new TimerTask(){
        public void run()
        {
            System.out.println("Updated");
        }
        }, System.currentTimeMillis(),1000);



    }

    public static void main(String[]args)
    {
        new Test();
    }


}

In here, you can see it is not printing anything! In other words, the time is not scheduled! Why is that? I want to schedule the task to happen in every second. Please help!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are telling the Timer to wait (approximately) 1363531420 milliseconds before executing your TimerTask. This works out to ~42 years. You should be using Timer.schedule(yourTask, 0, 1000).

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Thanks a lot for the reply :) +1 from me :) –  Sniper Mar 17 '13 at 14:49
    
+1 for mentioning ~42 years ;) –  Vishal K Mar 17 '13 at 14:59

Try to execute this code:

import java.util.Timer;
import java.util.TimerTask;

public class Test {

    public Test()
    {
        Timer timer = new Timer();
        timer.schedule(new TimerTask(){
        public void run()
        {
            System.out.println("Updated");
        }
        }, 0,1000);



    }

    public static void main(String[]args)
    {
        new Test();
    }


}
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Thanks a lot for the reply :) +1 from me :) –  Sniper Mar 17 '13 at 14:50

Take a look at the javadoc, there are two methods:

schedule(TimerTask task, Date firstTime, long period) 
schedule(TimerTask task, long delay, long period) 

You are passing in (TimerTask, long, long) and are therefore invoking the second one - i.e. schedule the task to run for the first time in System.currentTimeMillis() millis and every second thereafter. So your task will run for the first time at Thu Jun 01 06:45:28 BST 2056, to find that out:

public static void main(String[] args) {        
    System.out.println(new Date(2*System.currentTimeMillis()));
}

You need to invoke the method with zero:

    Timer timer = new Timer();
    timer.schedule(new TimerTask() {
        public void run() {
            System.out.println("Updated");
        }
    }, 0, 1000);

This means schedule the task to run for the first time in zero millis and every second thereafter.

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Thanks a lot for the reply :) +1 from me :) –  Sniper Mar 17 '13 at 14:49

You have set the delay to the current time in millis (which would be a very long time :) ). You probably intended this:

public class Test {

    public Test()
    {
        Timer timer = new Timer();
        timer.schedule(new TimerTask(){
            public void run()
            {
                System.out.println("Updated");
            }
        }, new Date(System.currentTimeMillis()),1000); //<--- Notice a date is being constructed


    }

    public static void main(String[]args)
    {
        new Test();
    }

}

Where you set the firstTime to the current date.

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While this would work, new Date() is shorthand for new Date(System.currentTimeMillis()) and it would be better to invoke with 0 anyway. –  Boris the Spider Mar 17 '13 at 15:00
    
Yes, new Date() is shorthand for new Date(System.currentTimeMillis()). I was just being explicit to be clear. –  rgaskill Mar 17 '13 at 15:19
    
Thanks for the reply. +1 from me :) –  Sniper Mar 17 '13 at 17:12

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