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For example, if I use vertex shader like the following:

#version 400 core

uniform mat4 projM;
uniform mat4 viewM;
uniform mat4 modelM;

in vec4 in_Position;

out vec4 pass_position_model;

void main(void) {
    gl_Position = projM * viewM * modelM * in_Position;
    pass_position_model = modelM * in_Position;
}

Will it do projM * viewM * modelM matrix multiplication for each vertex, or it it smart enough to calculate if once and do not recalculate until uniform variables are changed? If it isn't "smart enough", then is there a way to optimize it other than computing all uniform-dependent values on CPU and send them as uniform variables to GPU?
Also I'm interested in solutions that can be ported to OpenGL ES 2.0 later without problems.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

So there is no general answer, as I understand. I did some tests on my hardware, though. I have 2 GPUs in my inventory, Intel HD Graphics 3000 and NVidia GeForce GT 555M. I tested my program (the program itself is written in java/scala) with matrix multiplication in vertex shader, and then moved multiplication to the CPU program and tested again.

(sphereN - it's a continuously rotating sphere with 2*N^2 quads, drawn with glDrawElements(GL_QUADS,...) with 1 texture and without any lighting/other effects)

matrix multiplication in vertex shader:

intel:
    sphere400: 57.17552887364208 fps
    sphere40: 128.1394156842645 fps
nvidia:
    sphere400: 134.9527665317139 fps
    sphere40: 242.0135527589545 fps

matrix multiplication on cpu:

intel:
    sphere400: 57.37234652897303 fps
    sphere40: 128.2051282051282 fps
nvidia:
    sphere400: 142.28799089356858 fps
    sphere40: 247.1576866040534 fps

Tests show that multiplicating (uniform) matrices in vertex shader is bad idea, at least on this hardware. So in general one may not rely on corresponding GLSL compiler optimization.

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Awsome. I'll have to keep that in mind. –  Wolfgang Skyler Mar 18 '13 at 15:18
    
+1 for profiling effort (and using the 2 graphics cards I have). –  GraphicsMuncher Apr 28 '13 at 4:17
    
+1. But how did you evaluate the results? It seems that the difference is almost negligible. I suggest running both simulations for 60 seconds and consider the best FPS reading only (since it represents the best performance the CPU/GPU can do). –  Calmarius Dec 25 '13 at 16:31
    
@Calmarius I kept it running for fixed amount of time (probably it was 1 minute, don't remember now) and taken average FPS. And yes, in this case difference is small, maybe it's because GPU is doing little work in both cases. But where you free it from multiplying matrices for each vertex, it performs better, and the difference is above measuring errors. –  Sarge Borsch Dec 26 '13 at 6:54

Will it do projM * viewM * modelM matrix multiplication for each vertex, or it it smart enough to calculate if once and do not recalculate until uniform variables are changed?

Ask the developer of the OpenGL implementation in question. The OpenGL specification has nothing to say about this, but driver and GLSL compiler writers may have implemented optimizations for this.

If it isn't "smart enough", then is there a way to optimize it other than computing all uniform-dependent values on CPU and send them as uniform variables to GPU?

No. You have to do the legwork yourself.

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If I'm interested only in the situation with a couple of today's lead vendors, for example NVidia, AMD, PoverVR, then the question may be easier? –  Sarge Borsch Mar 17 '13 at 15:13
    
@SargeBorsch: It does not become easier to answer, because optimizations like this are usually kept a trade secret. At least for the open source drivers of the Mesa project you can see what they do. But with the closed source drivers from NVidia, AMD and Imaginon it's impossible to make a definite statement. –  datenwolf Mar 17 '13 at 16:06

All OpenGL and GLSL optimizations are vendor specific. It is quite hard to tell what is the final output from the glsl compiler.

You can look here for vendor specific information: http://renderingpipeline.com/graphics-literature/low-level-gpu-documentation/

For your code you can always 'pack' matrices into new uniform: matModelViewProjection, multiply it in the application and send it to the vertex shader.

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That depends entirely on the driver. OpenGL is a specification, if you pay them for the rights to make an implimentation they'll give you a sample implimentation to use, but that's it.

Aside from that you need to consider matrix multiplications restrictions, doing projM * viewM * modelM * vertex is not the same as doing vertex * projM * viewM * modelM. That's because matrices are multiplyed right to left, and the order does matter with that. So the shader could'nt pre-computed projM * viewM * modelM to share between vertices, because that would give you bogus results.

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Are you sure? projM * viewM * modelM * in_Position equals to (projM * viewM * modelM) * in_Position (at least, it gives indistinguishable frames in my program, where all 3 matrices are not trivial). But matrices are indeed multiplied right to left. –  Sarge Borsch Mar 17 '13 at 15:20
    
Really? odd. To do a test run, using you're computer you could make a simple program that computes the projM * viewM * modelM matrix on the CPU and then passes it to the shader. Also, you should be able to see what it end's up being with glGetShaderSource, to see if it's doing anything odd with you're code before compiling. –  Wolfgang Skyler Mar 17 '13 at 15:32
    
I recently read an acticle in the Internet about that, it said that it's valid optimisation to change M1 * M2 * v to M1 * (M2 * v), so it can be done backwards also, if the M1 * M2 is precomputed. Unfortunately, i cannot find link to it :( –  Sarge Borsch Mar 17 '13 at 15:53
    
We'll, Mathimatically, it makes little sense. But they could have easly changed it around in the programming. However, I doubt it'll pre-compute the matrices for you in any case. It's doing as told. You could program in the optimization your-self, However, ultimatly it comes down to the programmer if the code's well optimized or a mess. ;) –  Wolfgang Skyler Mar 17 '13 at 16:05
5  
Matrix multiplication IS associative -- (A * B) * C is the same as A * (B * C). It IS NOT commutative -- A * B is not the same as B * A –  Chris Dodd Mar 17 '13 at 17:42

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