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I read a lot of posts and comments on the Internet about Bitmap and Memory Leaks on screen rotation.

Actually, the issue i am experiencing is quite particular...

I use Eclipse DDMS and I am watching at the heap memory occupied by 1 byte arrays, which are related to my bitmaps placed in four ImageView, each one of them in a page of a ViewFlipper. The images are loaded from internal memory and are 216-220KB big, and I use a layer drawable in order to draw another transparent image on top of them.

Keeping an eye on the heap memory occupied by the bitmaps, if I change the orientation of the device, the memory increases of some MB. Causing 2-3 GC, in a few moments the amount of memory decreases to the initial value. Slowly repeating the process (change orientation + 2-3 Force Garbage Collection), the amount of memory increases but then goes back at the same value. This makes me think I am doing it right with Bitmap management in my application.

But if I start rotating repeatedly and quickly the device, I see the amount of memory increasing continuously.... and subsequent GC will only be able to reduce the heap occupation by a little amount of memory in comparison to its rapid growth during fast rotation.

Is Android unable to Garbage collecting so fast? Why am I able to keep memory usage stable if I slowly rotate and not if I repeatedly rotate faster without forcing GC for a while?

Android 4.1.2 / Samsung Galaxy S3.

The code below is called whenever a png is read from internal storage or downloaded by an AsyncTask from the internet. Disabling AsyncTasks (thus excluding pending tasks through subsequent rotations) does not change the scene, it is enough to load the two "layers" from the internal storage at startup to quickly fill the heap while rotating the device.

public void setBitmap(Bitmap bitmap) 
{
    try{
        Drawable layers[] = new Drawable[2];
        Bitmap fvgBackgroundBmp = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), R.drawable.fvg_background2);
        layers[0] = new BitmapDrawable(getResources(), fvgBackgroundBmp);
        layers[1] = new BitmapDrawable(getResources(), bitmap);
        LayerDrawable layerDrawable = new LayerDrawable(layers);
        setImageDrawable(layerDrawable);
        mLayerDrawableAvailable = true;
    }
    catch(Exception outOfMemory)
    {
        Log.e("setBitmap got exception", outOfMemory.getLocalizedMessage());
    }
}

The method unbindDrawables() called from the Activity's onDestroy() does not help:

public void unbindDrawables()
{
    if(mLayerDrawableAvailable)
    {
        LayerDrawable lDrawable = (LayerDrawable) getDrawable();
        if(lDrawable != null)
        {   
            lDrawable.getDrawable(1).setCallback(null);
            lDrawable.getDrawable(0).setCallback(null);
            lDrawable.setCallback(null);
        }
    }
}
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I think the only way to help you, is that you present a minimum working project which has the described behavior. Then somebody can test it and see what happens. –  Adam Stelmaszczyk Mar 28 '13 at 23:41

2 Answers 2

onDestroy is not guaranteed to be called when memory pressure is high. This might explain it. Try calling unbindDrawables from onStop()

http://developer.android.com/training/basics/activity-lifecycle/stopping.html#Stop

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I would try to get back Bitmap from Your layers drawable and recycle it.

public void unbindDrawables()
{
    if(mLayerDrawableAvailable)
    {
        LayerDrawable lDrawable = (LayerDrawable) getDrawable();
        if(lDrawable != null)
        {   
            ((BitmapDrawable)lDrawable.getDrawable(1)).getBitmap().recycle();
            ((BitmapDrawable)lDrawable.getDrawable(0)).getBitmap().recycle();
            lDrawable.setCallback(null);
        }
    }
}

Try to call unbindDrawables() in body of onDestroy() event in Your activity.

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