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I have found a following piece of code:

switch(val){
    case 0:
        // some actions
       break;
    case 1:
        // some actions
       break;
    case 2:
        // some actions
       break;
}

But it is not clear enough what will happen in the case of e.g val = 10?

I tried to test this code in a short program with incorrect value, and nothing had happen - program exited normally.

Can this code cause any potential error? Is there any guarantee that nothing will happen?

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A switch is essentially a glorified list of gotos, if you think of it that way it's clear that you'll never get an error. –  teppic Mar 17 '13 at 15:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It will simply do nothing and not enter in any case.

It is recommended to have a default clause as the final clause in a switch statement. Programs like Lint will warn if you forget the default clause. And for information note that the default clause is required in MISRA-C.

EDIT:

I personally prefer it to be the final clause but I think the most important is for the final clause to be present. Why I prefer it to be the final clause is because of the Principle of least astonishment: people are used to see it as the final clause so I think it eases the program reading.

And just for information as I mentioned Lint and MISRA-C in my answer: PC-Lint / flexelint will not warn if default is present but not as the final clause and MISRA-C explicitly requires default to be present as the final clause.

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I sometimes (I'd say very often) put the default as the first case label :) –  pmg Mar 17 '13 at 15:32
    
@pmg I added an edit on this topic. –  ouah Mar 17 '13 at 15:46
    
I prefer not to use default clauses with no code. Tools like Lint complain if you don't have one, but if you are switching on an enum and you add a new possible value to the enum but not your switch statement, having a default case prevents the Java compiler from giving you the (far more useful) warning that your switch may be incomplete (ie: you haven't handled the new enum value.) –  spaaarky21 Jul 22 '13 at 22:38

That is why you should have a default case. It will handle cases other than those you typed.

What Happens in your case is that, it checks the case 0 and it doesn't match and checks case 1 and it also doesn't match and checks the case 2 and it again doesn't match. so it exits..

So it should be this way:

switch(val){
    case 0:
        // some actions
       break;
    case 1:
        // some actions
       break;
    case 2:
        // some actions
       break;
    default:
       //some actions
       break;
}

Another small point to note: it should case 0: not case 0;

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I supposed that it works like a jump table, not as a sequence of if-else –  Alex Mar 17 '13 at 15:33
    
it should case 0: not case 0; edited –  Alex Mar 17 '13 at 15:35
    
yes jump table. jumps to the correct value, if it doesn't there should be a default case, so it will hit at least one of them.. –  lakesh Mar 17 '13 at 15:35

If you use any other value from 0, 1, 2 (in this example) nothing will happen. val will be compared with all values that are in cases and if it will not be equal to one of them, it just will jump to the next statement.

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