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I'm trying to create a class using Activator.CreateInstance and cast it to a generic interface it implements.

Why am I getting 'InvalidCastException' at run time (.Net 4.0)?

Here is the code:

namespace CastingGenerics
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var typeFromSomewhere = typeof(ActionSomethingValidator);

            // This line throw 'System.InvalidCastException'
            // "Unable to cast object of type 'CastingGenerics.ActionSomethingValidator' to type 'CastingGenerics.IActionValidator`1[CastingGenerics.IAction]'."
            var castingError = (IActionValidator<IAction>)Activator.CreateInstance(typeFromSomewhere);
        }
    }

    internal interface IAction
    {
    }

    internal interface IActionValidator<in T>
        where T : IAction
    {
        bool Validate(T action, out string failure);
    }

    internal abstract class ActionValidator<T> : IActionValidator<T>
        where T : IAction
    {
        public abstract bool Validate(T action, out string failure);
    }

    internal class ActionSomethingValidator : ActionValidator<IActionSomething>
    {
        public override bool Validate(IActionSomething action, out string failure)
        {
            failure = string.Empty;
            return true;
        }
    }

    internal interface IActionSomething : IAction
    {
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you get is an IActionValidator<IActionSomething>. IActionValidator<IActionSomething> cannot be assigned to IActionValidator<IAction>, because T is marked as an in type parameter.

Imagine, that for an IActionValidator<IAction> variable named v, there is the following Validate method:

Validate(IAction action, out string failure);

Now, if v pointed to an instance of IActionValidator<IActionSomething>, you could pass an IAction instance to the first parameter via v that does not implement IActionSomething. However, exactly the latter would be required for IActionValidator<IActionSomething>. Therefore, the compiler will not let you do this.

share|improve this answer
    
it still doesn't work even if i remove the in keyword from IActionValidator<in T> –  avivr Mar 17 '13 at 15:44
    
@avivr: Of course; without the in keyword, neither of IActionValidator<IAction> and IActionValidator<IActionSomething> can be assigned to each other. With the inkeyword, IActionValidator<IAction> can be assigned to IActionValidator<IActionSomething>, but not the other way round. That would be possible with the out keyword - but that in turn would contradict your declaration of Validate. –  O. R. Mapper Mar 17 '13 at 15:57
1  
I agree with @O.R.Mapper . The cast fails because of the constraint on the ActionValidator<T> class. So the class ActionSomethingValidator can only be casted to IActionValidator<IActionSomething>. –  Dinesh Mar 17 '13 at 16:22

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