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What's the best way to make a deep copy of a data structure in Perl?

Before I start coding this myself and reinventing the wheel, how do you copy a hash of hashes without duplicating the hashrefs?

I'm reading a hash of hash of hashes via Config::General. i.e., the data structure is:

my %config = ( group => { item1 => { foo => 'value',
                                     bar => 'value',
                                   },
                          item2 => { foo => 'value',
                                     bar => 'value',
                                   },
                          item3 => { foo => 'value',
                                     bar => 'value',
                                   },
                        },
             );

I then pull my group from the config by dereferencing it and change the contents at runtime prior to rewriting the config file:

my %group = %{$config{'group'}};

The problem is that I need to check to see if changes were made and make associated changes to the system's file structure. I can't do this by checking:

if ($group{'item1'}{'foo'} ne $config{'group'}{'item1'}{'foo'}) {
    ### Stuff!
}

as $group{'item1'} and $config{'group'}{'item1'} are both the exact same hashref.

Now while it should be trivial to simply re-parse the config file, and compare the parsed copy from the disk against the edited version just before saving to disk, I'm sure there's a way to to a nested dereference of a complex data structure, copying the contents of the hash refs and not simply copying the references themselves. A cursory examination on CPAN doesn't turn anything up. What am I missing?

Benchmark

Got my answer:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use Benchmark qw(:all) ;
use Storable qw(dclone);
use Clone qw(clone);

my %config = ( group => { item1 => { foo => 'value',
                                     bar => 'value',
                                   },
                          item2 => { foo => 'value',
                                     bar => 'value',
                                   },
                          item3 => { foo => 'value',
                                     bar => 'value',
                                   },
                        },
             );

my $ref = $config{'group'};

timethese(100000, {
  'Clone' => sub { my %group = %{ clone $ref }},
  'Storable' => sub {  my %group = %{ dclone $ref }},
});

results in:

Benchmark: timing 100000 iterations of Clone, Storable...
   Clone:  2 wallclock secs ( 2.26 usr +  0.01 sys =  2.27 CPU) @ 44052.86/s (n=100000)
Storable:  5 wallclock secs ( 4.71 usr +  0.02 sys =  4.73 CPU) @ 21141.65/s (n=100000)
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marked as duplicate by Ether, martin clayton, Clyde Lobo, ЯegDwight, j0k Sep 20 '12 at 20:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
If, as you say, you got your answer, you should check the post that answered your question as the correct answer. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 10 '09 at 15:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 22 down vote accepted
use Storable qw(dclone);
$group2 = dclone(\%group);
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From the Storable::dclone documentation I found Clone:

my $copy = clone (\@array);

# or

my %copy = %{ clone (\%hash) };

Don't need flexibility, and claims to be faster than Storable::dclone.

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1  
Benchmark shows this is about twice as fast as dclone –  Oesor Oct 9 '09 at 22:40

Deep data structure 101:

  • Use Storable's dclone to make a deep copy of a structure, and freeze and thaw to serialize/deserialize them for storage (say in a database, or an http cookie (but you should encrypt anything you send to the user to make it harder to tamper with).
  • Use Data::Compare (or Test::Deep or Test::Differences inside a unit test) to compare two deep data structures.
  • Use Data::Dumper or Data::Dump in debugging to see what your objects look like. But don't use that as a licence to tamper with another object's internals; use the API. :)
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1  
Data::Compare's new to me as well, I've just been unwinding my hashes to check them out. I'll be sure to try it some time to compare really complicated stuff; thanks –  Oesor Oct 9 '09 at 22:44
1  
Test::Deep, and Test::Differences are falling out of favor because of the ubiquitous Test::More's new is_deeply functionality - check it out. Dirt simple to use, and you get a pretty error. –  Evan Carroll Oct 11 '09 at 2:25

Could always store the hash via Storable or Data::Dumper, and reassigned the stored value into a new hash. This should get a full copy without maintaining the referenced links.

use Storable;
my $serialized = freeze \%config;
my %newconfig = %{ thaw($serialized) };
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2  
There is special function dclone for this case –  Ivan Nevostruev Oct 9 '09 at 22:21

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