Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

According to this similar StackOverflow question and other articles, C# methods are "not virtual" by default, which I take it to mean that you cannot override them in a derived class.

If that is true, could you please explain to me how, in the example below, how I am able to implement the property LastName in the Child class which inherits from Base class without the property being marked as "virtual" inh the base class? Does the Child.LastName property "hide" (VB "Shadows") the same property in the base class? if so, why is the "new" key word not used in the Child.LastName pproperty to indicate this?

This test example seems to suggest to me that methods and virtual by default and, in the case of the LastName property, "overrrides" is implied, but I'm pretty sure that this is not the case.

What am I missing?

public class BaseClass
{

    private string _FirstName;
    public virtual string FirstName {
        get { return _FirstName; }
        set { _FirstName = value; }
    }

    private string _LastName;
    public string LastName {
        get { return _LastName; }
        set { _LastName = value; }
    }

    public void Go()
    {
        MessageBox.Show("Going at default speed in Base Class");
    }

    public void Go(int speed)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("Going at " + speed.ToString() + " in Base Class");
    }
}


public class Child : BaseClass
{

    public override string FirstName {
        get { return "Childs First  Name"; }
        set { base.FirstName = value; }
    }

    public string LastName {
        get { return "Child's Last Name"; }
        set { base.LastName = value; }
    }

    public void Go()
    {
        MessageBox.Show("Going in Child Class");
    }

    public void Go(int speed)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("Going at " + speed.ToString() + " in Child Class");
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
I believe that Child.LastName is an entirely new property that shadows the base class one in this case, and is bound early by the compiler. Try ((BaseClass) new Child()).LastName to see which implementation is called. –  millimoose Mar 17 '13 at 19:08
    
That code should be giving you warnings on FirstName, LastName, and both Go methods telling you to use new –  shf301 Mar 17 '13 at 19:11
2  
What you're missing is you're not reading the output of the compiler which is telling you that you forgot to say "new". Read the compiler output; it's usually telling you something interesting. –  Eric Lippert Mar 17 '13 at 19:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

well, you got it right. If it's not virtual, it gets hidden.

The new keyword brakes the virtual overriding in the inheritance hierarchy chain.

Simple example to read: Polymorphism, Method Hiding and Overriding in C#

share|improve this answer
    
I could have marked any of the responses as the Answer but I really liked this example. It addressed my exact question. everybody voted up. Thanks to all . –  ChadD Mar 17 '13 at 20:06

Methods are not virtual in C# by default. LastName in Child class hides the LastName from the BaseClass. As far as i can remember, this code can even compile, but warning will be provided by compiler, telling that new keyword should be used.

share|improve this answer

They're non-virtual by default.

The subclass hides the base's LastName property.

If you write:

BaseClass b = new Child(...);
Console.WriteLine(b.LastName);

You will see the base implementation is called.

The compiler will warn you about this when you compile the above code. It's standard practice to mark a member which hides a base's member as new.

public new string LastName {
    get { return "Child's Last Name"; }
    set { base.LastName = value; }
}

This is a very common C# programming interview question :)

share|improve this answer

A good understanding of Polymorphism will clear this up:

Polymorphism (C# Programming Guide)

Hiding Base Class Members with New Members


If you want your derived member to have the same name as a member in a base class, but you do not want it to participate in virtual invocation, you can use the new keyword. The new keyword is put before the return type of a class member that is being replaced. The following code provides an example:

public class BaseClass
{
    public void DoWork() { WorkField++; }
    public int WorkField;
    public int WorkProperty
    {
        get { return 0; }
    }
}

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public new void DoWork() { WorkField++; }
    public new int WorkField;
    public new int WorkProperty
    {
        get { return 0; }
    }
}

Hidden base class members can still be accessed from client code by casting the instance of the derived class to an instance of the base class. For example:

DerivedClass B = new DerivedClass();
B.DoWork();  // Calls the new method.

BaseClass A = (BaseClass)B;
A.DoWork();  // Calls the old method.

Preventing Derived Classes from Overriding Virtual Members


Virtual members remain virtual indefinitely, regardless of how many classes have been declared between the virtual member and the class that originally declared it. If class A declares a virtual member, and class B derives from A, and class C derives from B, class C inherits the virtual member, and has the option to override it, regardless of whether class B declared an override for that member. The following code provides an example:

public class A
{
    public virtual void DoWork() { }
}
public class B : A
{
    public override void DoWork() { }
}

A derived class can stop virtual inheritance by declaring an override as sealed. This requires putting the sealed keyword before the override keyword in the class member declaration. The following code provides an example:

public class C : B
{
    public sealed override void DoWork() { }
}

In the previous example, the method DoWork is no longer virtual to any class derived from C. It is still virtual for instances of C, even if they are cast to type B or type A. Sealed methods can be replaced by derived classes by using the new keyword, as the following example shows:

public class D : C
{
    public new void DoWork() { }
}

In this case, if DoWork is called on D using a variable of type D, the new DoWork is called. If a variable of type C, B, or A is used to access an instance of D, a call to DoWork will follow the rules of virtual inheritance, routing those calls to the implementation of DoWork on class C.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.